Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

U.S. Solar Capacity Hits Another Major Milestone

Business

Solar energy generation continues to climb in the U.S. with more than half a million homes and businesses now generating solar energy. Greentech Media's GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) have just released another positive report for the second quarter of this year.

The U.S. installed 1,133 megawatts (MW) of solar photovoltaics (PV) during the second quarter, with residential and commercial segments accounting for nearly half of solar PV installations in the quarter. It's the fourth largest quarter for solar installations since the sector's debut and the third consecutive quarter with more than 1 GW installed. Installed capacity in the U.S. is now close to 16 GW, enough to power 3.2 million homes.

SEIA president and CEO Rhone Resch pointed to the benefits of this growth, saying, “Solar continues to soar, providing more and more homes, businesses, schools and government entities across the United States with clean, reliable and affordable electricity. Today, the solar industry employs 143,000 Americans and pumps nearly $15 billion a year into our economy. By any measurement, these policies are paying huge dividends for both the U.S. economy and our environment—and should be maintained, if not expanded, given their tremendous success, as well as their importance to America’s future.”

“Solar continues to be a primary source of new electric generation capacity in the U.S.” said GTM Research senior vice president Shayle Kann. “With new sources of capital being unlocked, design and engineering innovations reducing system prices, and sales channels rapidly diversifying, the solar market is quickly gaining steam to drive significant growth for the next few years.”

GTM Research and SEIA are projecting that 6.5 GW of PV will be installed in the U.S. by the end of this year, up 36 percent over 2013.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Solar Energy Dominates First Quarter With 74 Percent of New Electric Capacity

Top 10 States Leading the U.S. in Solar Energy Growth

20 Cities Shining Brightest With Solar Energy

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sign marks the ground covering TransCanada's Keystone I pipeline outside of Steele City, Nebraska on April 21, 2012. Lucas Oleniuk / Toronto Star via Getty Images

The company behind the controversial and long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline announced it would proceed with the project Tuesday, despite concerns about the climate impacts of the pipeline and the dangers of transporting construction crews during a pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Penguins are seen near the Great Wall station in Antarctica, Feb. 9, days after the continent measured its hottest temperature on record at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Xinhua / Liu Shiping / Getty Images

By Richard Connor

Scientists have recorded Antarctica's first documented heat wave, warning that animal and plant life on the isolated continent could be drastically affected by climate change.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Athos I tanker was carrying crude oil from Venezuela when a collision caused oil to begin gushing into the Delaware River. U.S. Department of the Interior

A case that has bounced around the lower courts for 13 years was finally settled yesterday when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision, finding oil giant Citgo liable for a clean up of a 2004 oil spill in the Delaware River, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
The buildings of downtown Los Angeles are partially obscured in the late afternoon on Nov. 5, 2019, as seen from Pasadena, California, a day when air quality for Los Angeles was predicted to be "unhealthy for sensitive groups." Mario Tama / Getty Images

The evidence continues to build that breathing dirty air is bad for your brain.

Read More Show Less
Wave power in Portugal. The oceans' energy potential is immense. Luis Ascenso, via Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

The amount of energy generated by tides and waves in the last decade has increased tenfold. Now governments around the world are planning to scale up these ventures to tap into the oceans' vast store of blue energy.

Read More Show Less