Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

U.S. Senators to Hold All-Night Session on Climate Change

Climate
U.S. Senators to Hold All-Night Session on Climate Change

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Nearly 30 U.S. senators all have the same plans for tonight—discussing climate change.

At least 28 senators, all democrats or independents, agreed to stay on the Senate floor for an all-night session allowing the legislators to discuss the issue and ideas on what to do about it. The session has been in the works for months and was organized by the Senate Climate Action Task Force.

The participating senators say they will be tweeting throughout the night, using the hashtag #Up4Climate.

“So many Senators coming together for an all-night session shows our commitment to wake up Congress to the dangers of climate change," California Sen. Barbara Boxer said. "All you have to do is look at China to see what happens to your country when you throw the environment under the bus.”

According to a statement from Hawaii Sen. Brian Schatz, here are the senators expected to participate:

Senators expected to participate include:

  • Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-NV
  • Dick Durbin, D-IL
  • Charles Schumer, D-NY
  • Patty Murray, D-WA
  • Brian Schatz, D-HI
  • Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI
  • Barbara Boxer, D-CA
  • Dianne Feinstein, D-CA
  • Ron Wyden, D-OR
  • Bill Nelson, D-FL
  • Maria Cantwell, D-WA
  • Benjamin L. Cardin, D-MD
  • Bernard Sanders, I-VT
  • Amy Klobuchar, D-MN
  • Mark Udall, D-CO
  • Tom Udall, D-NM
  • Jeanne Shaheen, D-NH
  • Jeff Merkley, D-OR
  • Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY
  • Al Franken, D-MN
  • Richard Blumenthal, D-CT
  • Chris Murphy, D-CT
  • Martin Heinrich, D-NM
  • Angus King, I-ME
  • Tim Kaine, D-VA
  • Elizabeth Warren, D-MA
  • Edward J. Markey, D-MA
  • Cory Booker, D-NJ

The Washington Post compared the strategy to that of Sens. Rand Paul (R-KY) and Ted Cruz (R-TX), who led late-night, double-digit-hour exchanges in the past year regarding drones and the government shutdown, respectively.

"The cost of Congress' inaction on climate change is too high for our communities, our kids and grandkids, and our economy,” Whitehouse said. “On Monday we’ll be sending a clear message: it’s time for Congress to wake up and get serious about addressing this issue.”

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

Florida Wildlife Federation / NBC2News / YouTube

In a dramatic rescue captured on camera, a Florida man ran into a pond and pried open an alligator's mouth in order to rescue his beloved puppy, all without dropping his cigar.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Imagesines / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Jean-Marc Neveu and Olivier Civil never expected to find themselves battling against disposable mask pollution.

When they founded their recycling start-up Plaxtil in 2017, it was textile waste they set their sights on. The project developed a process that turned fabrics into a new recyclable material they describe as "ecological plastic."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Fossil fuel companies received $110 billion in direct and indirect financial assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, including up to $15.2 billion in direct federal relief. Andrew Hart /

By Bret Wilkins

In a year in which the United States has already suffered 16 climate-driven extreme weather events causing more than $1 billion in economic damages, and as millions of American workers face loss of essential unemployment benefits due to congressional inaction, a report published Monday reveals the Trump administration has given fossil fuel companies as much as $15.2 billion in direct relief — and tens of billions more indirectly — through federal COVID-19 recovery programs since March.

Read More Show Less
Flint corn is an example of pre-contact food. Elenathewise / Getty Images

By Ashia Aubourg

As Thanksgiving approaches, some Indigenous organizations and activists caution against perpetuating further injustices towards Native communities. Indigenous activist Mariah Gladstone, for example, encourages eaters to celebrate the harvest time in ways that do not involve stereotypes and pilgrim stories.

Read More Show Less

By Alex Middleton

Losing weight and reducing fat is a hard battle to fight. Thankfully, there are fat burner supplements that help you gain your target body and goal. However, how would you know which supplement is right for you?

Read More Show Less