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U.S. Senate Candidate Scott Brown Flip Flops on Climate Change

Climate

Back in 2012, when he got trounced by Elizabeth Warren in the U.S. Senate race in Massachusetts, losing the seat he won in a special election in 2010, Republican candidate Scott Brown was clear where he stood on climate change.

Former Senator Scott Brown is trying to get back into the Senate in a new state with a new position on climate change.

“I absolutely believe that climate change is real, and I believe there's a combination between man-made and natural,” he said in a debate during that campaign. "We need to work together, finding that balance to not only address our climate change problems but also to allow people to work and create jobs.”

Now he's crossed state lines to New Hampshire where he's running against Democratic incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen. And when he was asked in a recent debate "Do you believe that the theory of man-made climate change has been scientifically proven?," he responded "No." Watch the video:

Billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer's group NextGen Climate has started running ads in New Hampshire, calling Brown out for his attempts to duck and weave on climate change. It's one of many areas where the slippery Brown is apparently trying to tailor his position to his audience.

NextGen's New Hampshire director Pete Kavanaugh said:

"New Hampshire voters see Scott Brown for what he is: someone more interested in his own political career than in the issues that matter to Granite State voters. From healthcare reform to immigration to a woman’s right to choose and now to climate change, Scott Brown can’t make up his mind about what he believes. If he couldn't make up his mind, that would be bad enough. The truth is that whatever Brown actually believes about global warming, he doesn't care enough about it to treat it as a serious subject. For him and his campaign consultants, it's just one more fuzzy bullet point to be 'adjusted' depending on the audience."

Although Brown's two years in the U.S. Senate gave him only a limited voting record, he did have the opportunity, which he took, to vote to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline. The League of Conservation voters gave him a score of 38 percent. That group's Victory Fund is also running ads in New Hampshire, highlighting Brown's heavy support from oil billionaires David and Charles Koch.

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