Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

U.S. Sen. Edward Markey Meets Pope For Climate Change Discussion

Climate
U.S. Sen. Edward Markey Meets Pope For Climate Change Discussion

A U.S. Senator met Pope Francis and discussed global climate change solutions in one fell swoop Thursday.

Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-MA) met with the pope and other high-level officials from the Vatican to discuss the importance of acting on the warming planet instead of waiting idly. Markey was one of five legislators from the around the world who met with Pope Francis and Cardinals in Rome.

“Francis has the moral authority to galvanize a political will to act,” Markey told the Boston Globe, “which will help legislators in countries around the world to pass the necessary legislation.”

U.S. Sen. Ed Markey had the pleasure of meeting Pope Francis to discuss climate change.
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The visit comes a week after Pope Francis compared battling climate change to safeguarding creation, advising the world that “if we destroy creation, creation will destroy us! Never forget this!”

Markey and the other visitors, who represented South Africa, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Italy and the Philippines, encouraged Pope Francis to continue using his platform stress the importance of climate change in the future, particularly through a moral scope.

“It was an honor and a privilege to meet with Pope Francis and other Vatican leaders to share our common concern about the challenge of our time, climate change,” said Markey, who chairs the Foreign Relations subcommittee on international climate issues and leads the U.S. Senate Climate Change Clearinghouse.

“The Pope and all people of faith understand that climate change is a moral issue, and that we are called to respond to this personal and planetary challenge.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

7 Quotes and Tweets You Can’t Miss From Senate’s All-Nighter on Climate Change

Watch All Four North Carolina GOP Senate Candidates Laugh When Asked About Climate Change

——–

 

A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Scientists are studying barley, the key ingredient in beer. Ridofranz / Getty Images

Researchers at UC-Riverside are investigating how barley, a key ingredient in beer, survives in such a wide variety of climates with hopes of learning what exactly makes it so resilient across climates.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Air France airplanes parked at the Charles de Gaulle/Roissy airport on March 24, 2020. SAMSON / AFP via Getty Images

France moved one step closer this weekend to banning short-haul flights in an attempt to fight the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A woman looks at a dead gray whale on the beach in the SF Bay area on May 23, 2019; a new spate of gray whales have been turning up dead near San Francisco. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Four gray whales have washed up dead near San Francisco within nine days, and at least one cause of death has been attributed to a ship strike.

Read More Show Less
A small tourist town has borne the brunt of a cyclone which swept across the West Australian coast. ABC News (Australia) / YouTube

Tropical Cyclone Seroja slammed into the Western Australian town of Kalbarri Sunday as a Category 3 storm before grinding a more-than 600-mile path across the country's Southwest.

Read More Show Less