Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

U.S. Carbon Emissions From Fossil Fuels Grew in 2013

Energy
U.S. Carbon Emissions From Fossil Fuels Grew in 2013

By Yanna Antypas and Tyson Brown

Once all data are in, energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in 2013 are expected to be roughly 2 percent above the 2012 level, largely because of a small increase in coal consumption in the electric power sector. Coal has regained some market share from natural gas since a low in April 2012.

However, the impact on overall emissions trends remains fairly small.

Graphic credit: U.S. Energy Information Administration

Emissions in 2013 were slightly more than 10 percent below 2005 levels, a significant contribution towards the goal of a 17 percent reduction in emissions from the 2005 level by 2020 that was adopted by the current Administration. This level of reduction is expected to continue through 2015, according to EIA's most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook.

Graphic credit: U.S. Energy Information Administration

CO2 emissions from energy activities declined four out of six years since their 2007 peak and were historically low (12 percent below the 2005 level) in 2012. From 2005 to 2013, the key energy-economic drivers of a changing U.S. energy landscape included:

  • Weak economic growth in recent years, dampening growth in energy demand compared to pre-recession expectations
  • Continuously improving energy efficiency across the economy, including buildings and transportation
  • High energy prices over the past four years, with the exception of natural gas, since about 2010
  • An abundant and inexpensive supply of natural gas, resulting from the widespread use of new production technologies for shale gas
  • Power sector decarbonization since 2010, as natural gas and renewables displaced coal

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

A seagull flies in front of the Rampion offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom. Neil / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

A key part of the United States' clean energy transition has started to take shape, but you may need to squint to see it. About 2,000 wind turbines could be built far offshore, in federal waters off the Atlantic Coast, in the next 10 years. And more are expected.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Frank La Sorte and Kyle Horton

Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean and South America.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kevin Maillefer / Unsplash

By Lynne Peeples

Editor's note: This story is part of a nine-month investigation of drinking water contamination across the U.S. The series is supported by funding from the Park Foundation and Water Foundation. Read the launch story, "Thirsting for Solutions," here.

In late September 2020, officials in Wrangell, Alaska, warned residents who were elderly, pregnant or had health problems to avoid drinking the city's tap water — unless they could filter it on their own.

Read More Show Less
Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less
New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less