Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

20 Canned Tuna Brands Ranked: How Sustainable Is Your Brand?

Popular
20 Canned Tuna Brands Ranked: How Sustainable Is Your Brand?

By David Pinsky

The U.S. is the largest market for canned tuna in the world. U.S. consumers purchase countless cans and serve up thousands of tuna melts day after day.


Today's flashy labels and PR claims from supermarket and national tuna brands can be confusing and sometimes deceiving. Even worse, much of the canned tuna available in the U.S. comes from destructive fishing practices and could be linked to human rights abuses.

Greenpeace is campaigning to clean up this dirty global industry to ensure workers' rights and healthy oceans for generations to come. We collectively have the power to transform the tuna industry, and that starts by being informed. That's why today we're excited to share our brand new canned Tuna Shopping Guideen Español, too!

We evaluated 20 well-known brands on their sourcing policies, whether they avoid shark finning and destructive fishing practices, whether they can trace their products back to sea, and how they protect human rights for seafood industry workers.

Click through to see how your favorite canned tuna brand ranks.

© Greenpeace

Wild Planet and American Tuna tied for first place, followed by Whole Foods and Ocean Naturals as the best choices for conscious shoppers. Walmart (18th), H-E-B (19th), and StarKist (20th) are the worst-ranked due to their reliance on destructive fishing methods and outstanding questions about the social responsibility of their products.

The differences between those at the top and the very bottom of our ranking couldn't be more pronounced.

Among the five largest supermarket chains in the country, Albertsons (eighth; notable store banners include Safeway, Vons, Jewel-Osco), Ahold Delhaize (10th; banners include Food Lion, Hannaford, Giant), and Kroger (11th; banners include Fred Meyer, QFC, Ralphs) all passed. Kroger, second only in size nationwide to Walmart, is even rolling out new responsibly-caught pole and line canned tuna this year.

While only 55 percent of the brands we assessed passed, that's up from around 40 percent when we ranked popular brands in 2015. Only a few years ago, Whole Foods led the nation as the first retailer to offer responsibly-caught store brand canned tuna. Today, 11 of the 14 retailers we assessed carry at least one responsibly-caught store brand product. That's a big deal—you might even call it the beginning of a tuna revolution.

These changes are happening because consumers like you demanded them.

As the call grows louder for seafood that doesn't wreck the oceans or perpetuate human rights abuses, it's time for some of the biggest in the industry that are failing to show some leadership. You guessed it: Costco (13th), Walmart (18th), and the big three tuna brands—Chicken of the Sea (15th), Bumble Bee (17th), and StarKist (20th)—all failed in this year's Tuna Guide.

The largest three tuna brands, in particular, are dragging down the U.S. market in a sea of ocean destruction. Chicken of the Sea, owned by the world's largest tuna company Thai Union, has a chance to right its ship. Its parent company has made bold claims on sustainability and human rights, though it remains to be seen how that translates into real action and better tuna for customers. The company still has a chance to lead and continue moving the industry in the right direction, but we need your help to demand immediate action.

Join us! Ask Chicken of the Sea to commit to protect the oceans and seafood workers.

If you're going to buy canned tuna, the next time you look on store shelves consider how your choices will impact the oceans and seafood workers. Keep the Tuna Shopping Guide close by, share it with your friends and family, and let your grocery store manager know why they should carry responsibly-caught canned tuna.

Together, we can protect the oceans for future generations.

Coast Guard members work to clean an oil spill impacting Delaware beaches. U.S. Coast Guard District 5

Environmental officials and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are racing to clean up a mysterious oil spill that has spread to 11 miles of Delaware coastline.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

What happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years? Halfpoint / Getty Images

By Dr. Kate Raynes-Goldie

Of all the plastic we've ever produced, only 9% has been recycled. So what happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years?

Read More Show Less

Trending

Plain Naturals offers a wide variety of CBD products including oils, creams and gummies.

Plain Naturals is making waves in the CBD space with a new product line for retail customers looking for high potency CBD products at industry-low prices.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump and Joe Biden arrive onstage for the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

Towards the end of the final presidential debate of the 2020 election season, the moderator asked both candidates how they would address both the climate crisis and job growth, leading to a nearly 12-minute discussion where Donald Trump did not acknowledge that the climate is changing and Joe Biden called the climate crisis an existential threat.

Read More Show Less
What will happen to all these batteries once they wear out? Ronny Hartmann / AFP / Getty Images

By Zheng Chen and Darren H. S. Tan

As concern mounts over the impacts of climate change, many experts are calling for greater use of electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels. Powered by advancements in battery technology, the number of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles on U.S. roads is increasing. And utilities are generating a growing share of their power from renewable fuels, supported by large-scale battery storage systems.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch