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Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. Robbie Shade / CC BY 2.0

Google has continued to curry political favor with staunch conservatives by making substantial financial contributions to more than a dozen groups that deny that the climate crisis is real, as The Guardian revealed in a bombshell investigation.

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Group photo of all mayors and leading members of the C40 World Mayors Summit during the summits opening press conference at Copenhagen City Hall seen on Oct. 9. Ole Jensen / Getty Images

Disappointed by the lack of concrete action at September's UN Climate Action Summit, the mayors of some of the world's biggest cities are taking matters into their own hands.

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Extinction Rebellion activists occupy the roadway at the Great Star around the Victory Column on Oct. 7 in Berlin. Carsten Koall / picture alliance via Getty Images

Climate activists from Extinction Rebellion (XR) blocked roads around Berlin's Victory Column near the Brandenburg Gate early on Monday morning as the first wave of demonstrations in a day of "civil disobedience" got underway in the German capital.

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UN Sec-Gen António Guterres arrives for a press briefing to mark the opening of the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly at the UN Sept. 18 in New York. TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP / Getty Images

By António Guterres

On the eve of the September UN Climate Action Summit, young women and men around the world mobilized by the millions and told global leaders: "You are failing us."

They are right.

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Luis Alfonso de Alba Gongora, the UN secretary-general's special envoy for the climate summit speaks at The World Economic Forum holds the Sustainable Development Impact Summit 2018 in New York on Sept. 24, 2018. Ben Hider / World Economic Forum

By Howard LaFranchi

When United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres decided to hold a high-level climate summit in conjunction with this year's General Assembly kicking off next week, he was well aware of the paradox of his initiative.

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the co-founding of The Climate Pledge at the National Press Club on Sept. 19 in Washington, DC. Paul Morigi / Getty Images for Amazon

The day before over 1,500 Amazon.com employees planned a walkout to participate in today's global climate strike, CEO Jeff Bezos unveiled a sweeping plan for the retail and media giant to be carbon neutral by 2040, 10 years ahead of the Paris agreement schedule.

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Covering Climate Now / YouTube screenshot

By Mark Hertsgaard

The United Nations Secretary General says that he is counting on public pressure to compel governments to take much stronger action against what he calls the climate change "emergency."

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NPR / YouTube screenshot

Democratic presidential candidates spent 13 minutes on climate change in the second presidential debate Wednesday evening in Detroit — one more minute than the 12 spent on Tuesday evening, according to a Washington Post tally.

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The people of Kiribati are under pressure to relocate due to sea level rise. Jonas Gratzer / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A group of Pacific island nations on Tuesday declared a climate crisis and said that developed nations, in particular Australia, have so far failed to take requisite action to avert the "grave consequences" their nations face, including the prospect of their lands being "uninhabitable as early as 2030."

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The European Investment Bank building (left) across from the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. Westend61 / Getty Images

When the calendar turns over to 2021, fossil fuel companies won't have the European Investment Bank (EIB) to turn to for loans anymore. The EU's lending arm has decided to use its money to help stop the climate crisis by no longer funding fossil fuel projects and to ramp up its investments in clean energy, according to Bloomberg.

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Climeworks Direct Air Capture plant, Switzerland. Credit: © Climeworks / Julia Dunlop

By Simon Evans

Machines that suck CO2 directly from the air could cut the cost of meeting global climate goals, a new study finds, but they would need as much as a quarter of global energy supplies in 2100.

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