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Trump vs. the World on the Climate Crisis

Climate

A groundbreaking study was released today by the Sierra Club Political Committee showing Donald Trump would be the only world leader to deny the science and dangers of climate change if elected president. The data in the report shows that Trump could possibly be the only world leader not calling for urgent climate action.

"Donald Trump's failure to acknowledge basic climate science wouldn't just leave him isolated on the world stage as president, it would undermine our relationships with key allies and threaten our ability to work effectively internationally," Sierra Club Global Climate Policy Director John Coequyt said.

"Trump's climate science denial would make him a global laughingstock if it wasn't so dangerous. Every single leader on Earth—from Germany to India to Somalia to Japan—recognizes that the climate crisis is happening and demands the world's attention, but Trump is sticking his head in the sand while the seas are rising."

The report shows a global consensus on climate change among world leaders and provides comprehensive research that identifies attributable, verifiable statements, quotes and actions from current world leaders, including Heads of State and Heads of Government. They all acknowledge climate science and the need for climate action. Many of the nations mentioned in the report have signed the Paris climate accord and submitted their climate plans to the United Nations.

"Anybody who cares about the health of our communities and the safety of our planet needs to know that Donald Trump would be the only leader of any nation determined to let it burn, if elected," Sierra Club Political Director Khalid Pitts said. "You can be sure that, in the meantime, the Sierra Club will do everything in our power to ensure that never happens."

The 195 nations included in the report represents the full, official list of nations recognized by the U.S. State Department, according to the Sierra Club.

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