Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

'Keep Your Tiny Hands Off Our Data'

Climate
'Keep Your Tiny Hands Off Our Data'

Hundreds of scientists gathered in Boston's Copley Square on Sunday to "stand up for science," marking the latest protest in a wave of outspoken political engagement from scientists in reaction to the Trump administration.

The rally, timed to coincide with the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston, brought together concerned scientists and activists from across the country.

While the event's organizers did not explicitly call out Trump, the signs protesters toted highlighted a larger concern for science's future. As Chris Mooney wrote in the Washington Post, "The challenges for scientists during the Trump administration could not only be bigger, but also potentially more diverse, than those seen during George W. Bush's administration."

Geoffrey Supran, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who studies renewable energy solutions to climate change, told the AP, scientists are responding to the Trump administration's "anti-science rhetoric."

"We're really trying to send a message today to Mr. Trump that America runs on science, science is the backbone of our prosperity and progress," Supran said.

For a deeper dive:

News: AP, Washington Post, The Hill, Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor

Commentary: Washington Post, Chris Mooney analysis

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Scientists believe sharks use bioluminescence to camouflage themselves. Jérôme Mallefet

Scientists have newly photographed three species of shark that can glow in the dark, according to a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science last month.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A FedEx truck travels along Interstate 10 by the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm near Palm Springs, California on Feb. 27, 2019. Robert Alexander / Getty Images

FedEx's entire parcel pickup and delivery fleet will become 100 percent electric by 2040, according to a statement released Wednesday. The ambitious plan includes checkpoints, such as aiming for 50 percent electric vehicles by 2025.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Empty freeways, such as this one in LA, were a common sight during COVID-19 lockdowns in spring 2020. vlvart / Getty Images

Lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic had the added benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around seven percent, or 2.6 billion metric tons, in 2020.

Read More Show Less
The meatpacking industry pushed back against COVID-19 safety restrictions in spring 2020. Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group / Reading Eagle / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Documents obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture by the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen and published Wednesday reveal how leading players in the meatpacking industry—one of the hardest-hit by the coronavirus pandemic—fought the minimal efforts imposed by the Trump administration to prevent the spread of Covid-19 in meat processing plants last spring.

Read More Show Less
A late snowfall could set back the growth of this budding lilac. oddharmonic / Flickr, CC BY-SA

By Richard B. Primack

Weather patterns across the U.S. have felt like a roller coaster ride for the past several months. December and January were significantly warmer than average in many locations, followed by February's intense cold wave and a dramatic warmup.

Read More Show Less