Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Trump Says EPA Regulations Are Ruining His Hair

Politics

At an event in Aiken, South Carolina Saturday, Donald Trump spoke about how he has been personally impacted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) regulations. “I’ll give you one regulation,” Trump told TIME in response to a question about the EPA's regulation on U.S. waterways.

Donald Trump has been mocked relentlessly for his over-the-top hairdo.
Albert H. Teich / Shutterstock.com

“So I build, and I build a lot of stuff. And I go into areas where they have tremendous water … And you have sinks where the water doesn’t come out ... You have showers where I can’t wash my hair properly, it’s a disaster!” he said, to laughter from the crowd.

“It’s true,” Trump continued. “They [the showerheads] have restrictors put in. The problem is you stay under the shower for five times as long.”

Trump is referring to low-flow showerheads, which along with low-flow faucets and toilets, save significant amounts of water while still providing adequate flow, according to the EPA, which developed the WaterSense label for shower heads, faucets and toilets.

The EPA wrote on its website:

Water-saving showerheads that earn the WaterSense label must demonstrate that they use no more than two [gallons per minute. Standard showerheads use 2.5]. The WaterSense label also ensures that these products provide a satisfactory shower that is equal to or better than conventional showerheads on the market. EPA worked with a variety of stakeholders—including consumers who tested various showerheads—to develop criteria for water coverage and spray intensity. All products bearing the WaterSense label—including water-efficient showerheads—must be independently certified to ensure they meet EPA water efficiency and performance criteria.

The EPA enumerated the economic and environmental savings of low flow devices:

The average family could save 2,900 gallons per year by installing WaterSense labeled showerheads. Since these water savings will reduce demands on water heaters, they will also save energy. In fact, the average family could save more than 370 kilowatt hours of electricity annually, enough to power a house for 13 days.

On a national scale, if every home in the United States installed WaterSense labeled showerheads, we could save more than $2.2 billion in water utility bills and more than 260 billion gallons of water annually. In addition, we could avoid about $2.6 billion in energy costs for heating water.

Trump's entire presidential campaign has been peppered with outrageous claims on environmental issues. On multiple occasions, he's called global warming "a hoax," going so far as to claim it's a concept “created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.” Among other comments, Trump has said the Keystone XL pipeline would have “no impact on the environment,” and has cited unusually cold days in fall as evidence that climate change doesn't exist.

He's repeatedly bashed President Obama for his call to action on climate change, particularly during the COP21 Paris talks. President Obama called the UN talks "an act of defiance" in the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris. In response, Trump said Obama's speech was “one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen, or perhaps most naive.”

“I think one of the dumbest statements I’ve ever heard in politics, in the history of politics as I know it, which is pretty good, was Obama’s statement that our number one problem is global warming,” said Trump.

He told The Hill, if he were president, he would have skipped the talks altogether. The talks have been generally hailed in the environmental community. Former CEO and Chairman of the Sierra Club Carl Pope called the Paris Agreement, which was finalized this weekend, the "greatest single victory since the emergence of the modern environmental movement."

Check out this hilarious segment on his hair from when The Donald hosted Saturday Night Live:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Donald Trump Attacked by Eagle Named Uncle Sam, GIF Goes Viral

Neil Young, Willie Nelson, Dave Matthews, John Mellencamp: Help Us Stop the DARK Act

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less
Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less

"Emissions from pyrotechnic displays are composed of numerous organic compounds as well as metals," a new study reports. Nodar Chernishev / EyeEm / Getty Images

Fireworks have taken a lot of heat recently. In South Dakota, fire experts have said President Trump's plan to hold a fireworks show is dangerous and public health experts have criticized the lack of plans to enforce mask wearing or social distancing. Now, a new study shows that shooting off fireworks at home may expose you and your family to dangerous levels of lead, copper and other toxins.

Read More Show Less
Billions worth of valuable metals such as gold, silver and copper were dumped or burned last year as electronic waste produced globally jumped to a record 53.6 million tons. Curtis Palmer / CC by 2.0

By Ashutosh Pandey

Billions worth of valuable metals such as gold, silver and copper were dumped or burned last year as electronic waste produced globally jumped to a record 53.6 million tons (Mt), or 7.3 kilogram per person, a UN report showed on Thursday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A women walks with COVID-19 care kits distributed by Boston's Office of Neighborhood Services in Boston, Massachusetts on May 28, 2020. The pandemic has led to a rise in single-use plastic items, but reusable bags and cloth masks can be two ways to reduce waste. JOSEPH PREZIOSO / AFP via Getty Images

This month is Plastic Free July, the 31 days every year when millions of people pledge to give up single-use plastics.

Read More Show Less