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5 Charts Trump Must See Before He Takes Office

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5 Charts Trump Must See Before He Takes Office

By Tyler Clevenger and Daniel Melling

"I love charts! I love charts!" Trump exalted back in August, to a cheering crowd of thousands.

On Jan. 20, Donald Trump will once again stand in front of a crowd, this time being sworn in as the 45th president of the U.S. During the campaign, Trump assured Americans he would preside over a time of rising employment, a growing economy and cheap, abundant, reliable energy.

Here are five charts that show why clean energy is key to keeping these promises.

Chart 1: The Cost of U.S. Renewable Energy Is Falling

Thanks in part to record-setting investment in the sector, the cost of generating clean, emissions-free energy has declined precipitously since 2008. Continued innovation and policy prioritization can ensure that prices decline even further than they are projected.

U.S. Department of Energy

Chart 2: Solar Energy Alone Provides More Jobs than Oil, Gas and Coal Extraction

Solar energy jobs have skyrocketed, largely due to plummeting prices that have increased U.S. demand. Adding millions of additional jobs in the wind power and energy efficiency sectors, the clean energy industry is one of the most rapidly-growing employers in the U.S.

Bloomberg

Furthermore, the single fastest-growing occupation in the U.S. is wind turbine service technician, with more than 100 percent growth forecast in the next decade.

Chart 3: States Are Cutting Emissions While Boosting Their Economies

Across the U.S., states are decoupling energy use and economic growth. Between 2000 and 2014, 33 states saw their economies grow by an average of 22 percent while reducing emissions by 12 percent. This decoupling is particularly prevalent in Northeast and Southern states, where a shift away from coal power has led to a decline in carbon dioxide emissions.

Brookings Institution

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