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Greenpeace Beams 'No Trump, Yes Paris' Onto Warsaw's Tallest Building

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On Wednesday night, Warsaw's highest building displayed a prominent message to POTUS: "No Trump, Yes Paris"

The action was organized by Greenpeace activists from Poland and Germany who are criticizing Donald Trump's' controversial decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.


The words were beamed onto the facade of the Palace of Culture and Science to mark Trump's arrival in Poland.

Trump is in the Polish capital before attending the G20 summit in Hamburg, where world leaders are reportedly planning to confront the climate-denier-in-chief about exiting the Paris accord.

"Trump is going to the G20 summit as an isolated politician," Paweł Szypulski of Greenpeace Poland said. "It is hard to imagine that during his visit to Warsaw he would find a common language in this matter with [Central and Eastern European Countries] countries, since all of them have signed the Paris agreement and since they realize that its implementation is in their best interest and in the interest of the whole European Union."

Greenpeace Poland also tweeted, "Dear. Mr Trump, welcome to Poland!"

While in Poland, Trump met with Polish President Andrzej Duda, where they discussed shifting Poland's energy use away from Russian energy sources toward U.S. natural gas.

But Wenonah Hauter, the executive director of Food & Water Watch, pointed out that U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) are expensive.

"For the economics to work, U.S. production costs have to be low while prices in importing countries stay high. In India, a major importer of U.S. LNG is now finding itself at the mercy of contracts that locked in high prices for U.S. LNG, relative to other sources of gas. This is how energy dominance will play out for those at the receiving end," Hauter wrote.

"Consumers in LNG exporting countries are also getting pinched. In Australia, for example, 'extreme' levels of LNG exports have caused economic disruptions. While the Industrial Energy Consumers of America's call for a moratorium on LNG exports is prudent, Trump is not known for his prudence."

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