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Trump Team Leaning Toward Pulling Out of Paris Agreement

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Trump Team Leaning Toward Pulling Out of Paris Agreement

The Trump administration is now seriously considering pulling out of the Paris Agreement following two senior-level meetings on the issue, multiple outlets reported Tuesday evening.


According to sources, White House counsel Don McGahn argued in meetings with senior advisers Monday and last week that the U.S. could not lower its emissions reductions commitments and remain in the accord, a viewpoint at odds with both the State Department and top Paris negotiators.

While the senior team remains divided on this issue and the president has not yet reached a final decision, Trump told supporters at a Saturday rally he would make a "big decision" on Paris over the next two weeks.

"The Trump team seems oblivious to the fact that climate protection is now viewed by leading allies and nations around the world as a key measure of moral and diplomatic standing," Paul Bledsoe, who served as a White House climate adviser under Bill Clinton and is now a lecturer at American University's Center for Environmental Policy, told the Washington Post in an email.

"The U.S. would be risking pariah status on the international stage by withdrawing from Paris, and even a fig leaf approach of technically staying in the agreement while ignoring most of its provisions would be better than pulling out altogether."

For a deeper dive:

New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, Politico, Bloomberg, The Hill

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