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Thousands Protest as Trump Makes First Hometown Visit

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Stephanie Keith / Greenpeace

Activists from Greenpeace USA joined thousands of New Yorkers Thursday to send a direct message of shared resistance to the Trump administration and its destructive policies.


Greenpeace activists in two rigid-hulled inflatable boats buzzed up and down the Hudson as Trump met with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on the U.S.S. Intrepid. Activists on both boats held up banners saying "Resist" and "Resiste."

"The devastation of Hurricane Sandy is still with us, and Trump's climate policies will only threaten our families, our homes and our communities more," said Greenpeace national canvass director Felicity von Sück. "Trump's denial of climate change, his targeting of communities of color and immigrants, his misogyny and homophobia and his dismissal of truth are a betrayal of everybody in this city. The fact that Trump can use his millions to insulate himself doesn't make climate change a hoax, just like it doesn't make bigotry and hatred disappear."

Trump returned to his hometown of New York City for the first time since taking office and hours after the House passed legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare.

A coalition of groups, including Working Families Party, United We Dream, and Iraq Vets Against the War, organized mass demonstrations across Trump's scheduled itinerary, bringing thousands to rallies at Trump Tower, DeWitt Clinton Park, and on the street side of the Intrepid Museum. The night before, Women's March organizers left him a projected message on the Intrepid.

"Iraq Vets Against War is joining with our fellow vets and New Yorkers today to send a message to Trump that we welcome refugees and immigrants with open arms, but we have to draw the line at his bigotry," said Matt Howard, co-director of Iraq Vets Against the War. "We are finished with Trump using vets and service members as political props to provide cover for an agenda built on hate and war mongering."

Trump returned to his hometown as the least popular president in recent history after 100 days. Fewer than one in five New Yorkers voted for him.

"Trump's first 100 days have been a nightmare for immigrants, for Muslims and for anyone who might risk losing health coverage if Congress approves Trumpcare," said Working Families Party membership director Nelini Stamp. "As long as Trump keeps pushing these harmful and hateful policies, protests will follow him everywhere he goes."

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