Quantcast

Trump's Border Wall Will Do 'Irreparable Harm'

Politics

The Center for Biological Diversity joined the Borderlands Project and other organizations Tuesday in launching Embattled Borderlands, a new story map project that details the various places, people and wildlife put in harm's way by border walls and militarization. The immersive web platform combines a decade of photo documentation and scientific data to highlight a region at the crossroads of destructive border security policies.

"The U.S.-Mexico borderlands are breathtakingly beautiful, richly diverse and highly threatened by walls and militarization," said Randy Serraglio, conservation advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity. "Many people don't understand how special this region is or the destructive disaster that Trump's proposals would cause. The Embattled Borderlands project will help change that."

The interactive resource weaves together cutting-edge mapping by the Environmental Systems Research Institute, compelling narrative and stunning professional photography by the International League of Conservation Photographers to create a vivid portrait of a place at the center of one of our nation's biggest conflicts.

"Thousands of species contribute to a complex web of life in the borderlands, many of which—such as jaguar and ocelot—are found nowhere else in the United States," said Serraglio. "The border region is fragile and vulnerable and Trump's wall would do irreparable harm."

"The borderlands are a melting pot of life and cultures, full of spectacular beauty and diversity," said Serraglio. "It would be a tragic mistake and a monumental injustice to sacrifice this unique landscape and the life it harbors for Trump's cynical, unnecessary border security folly."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Volunteers participate in 2018's International Coastal Cleanup in (clockwise from top left) the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Norway and Washington, DC. Ocean Conservancy / Gabriel Ortiz, David Kwaku Sakyi, Kristin Folsland Olsen, Emily Brauner

This coming Saturday, Sept. 21 is the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC), the annual Ocean Conservancy event that mobilizes volunteers in more than 100 countries to collect litter from beaches and waterways and record what they find.

Read More Show Less
Students hold a Youth Strike for Climate Change Protest in London, UK on May 24. Dinendra Haria / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

The New York City public schools will allow their 1.1 million students to skip school for Friday's global climate strike, The New York Times reported Monday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The 16-year-old Swede Greta Thunberg speaks during her protest action for more climate protection with a reporter. Steffen Trumpf / picture alliance / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

It's been 30 years since Bill McKibben rang the warning bells about the threat of man-made climate change — first in a piece in The New Yorker, and then in his book, The End of Nature.

Read More Show Less
At the International Motor Show (IAA), climate protestors are calling for a change in transportation politics. © Kevin McElvaney / Greenpeace

Thousands of protestors marched in front of Frankfurt's International Motor Show (IAA) on Saturday to show their disgust with the auto industry's role in the climate crisis. The protestors demanded an end to combustion engines and a shift to more environmentally friendly emissions-free vehicles, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Setting and testing the line protections for Siemens SF6 gas insulated switchgear in 2007. Xaf / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Electricity from renewable sources is growing exponentially as the technology allows for cheaper and more efficient energy generation, but there is a dark side that has the industry polluting the most powerful greenhouse gas known to humanity, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Elizabeth Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Sweet and regular potatoes are both tuberous root vegetables, but they differ in appearance and taste.

They come from separate plant families, offer different nutrients, and affect your blood sugar differently.

Read More Show Less
Scientists in Saskatchewan found that consuming small amounts of neonicotinoids led white-crowned sparrows to lose significant amounts of weight and delay migration, threatening their ability to reproduce. Jen Goellnitz / Flickr

By Julia Conley

In addition to devastating effects on bee populations and the pollination needed to feed humans and other species, widely-used pesticides chemically related to nicotine may be deadly to birds and linked to some species' declines, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is set to unveil a package of measures on Friday, Sept. 20, to ensure that the country cuts its greenhouse gas emissions 55% by 2030, compared with the 1990 levels.

Read More Show Less