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Trump Makes Feather-Ruffling Remarks About Renewables

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Trump Makes Feather-Ruffling Remarks About Renewables

By Climate Denier Roundup

At a rally in Pennsylvania on Monday, Donald Trump made some feather-ruffling remarks about renewable energy, directing criticisms at wind and solar power.

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"The wind kills all your birds. All your birds, killed. You know, the environmentalists never talk about that," Trump reportedly said.

Actually, environmentalists do talk about that, especially when they're forced to rebuff bird-brained arguments by repeat deniers.

An estimated 970 million birds crash into buildings annually. By comparison, wind turbines kill approximately 500,000 birds a year, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A 2013 study found that fossil fuel plants "pose a much greater threat to birds and avian wildlife than wind farms."

Trump also said that solar is "so expensive" and "not working so good." It seems that Trump decided to wing it instead of actually checking the facts, because according to Solar Energy Industries Association, the cost of solar has actually fallen 70 percent in the past 10 years and rooftop solar is already at grid parity in 20 states. The U.S. also reached the milestone of one million solar installations nationwide in May, so we'd say it's working pretty well.

Honestly, we're a little surprised Trump is even worried about the birds, considering he's run a-fowl of them before!

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