Quantcast

Trump Makes Feather-Ruffling Remarks About Renewables

Popular

By Climate Denier Roundup

At a rally in Pennsylvania on Monday, Donald Trump made some feather-ruffling remarks about renewable energy, directing criticisms at wind and solar power.

giphy.com

"The wind kills all your birds. All your birds, killed. You know, the environmentalists never talk about that," Trump reportedly said.

Actually, environmentalists do talk about that, especially when they're forced to rebuff bird-brained arguments by repeat deniers.

An estimated 970 million birds crash into buildings annually. By comparison, wind turbines kill approximately 500,000 birds a year, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A 2013 study found that fossil fuel plants "pose a much greater threat to birds and avian wildlife than wind farms."

Trump also said that solar is "so expensive" and "not working so good." It seems that Trump decided to wing it instead of actually checking the facts, because according to Solar Energy Industries Association, the cost of solar has actually fallen 70 percent in the past 10 years and rooftop solar is already at grid parity in 20 states. The U.S. also reached the milestone of one million solar installations nationwide in May, so we'd say it's working pretty well.

Honestly, we're a little surprised Trump is even worried about the birds, considering he's run a-fowl of them before!

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Insects play a vital role in ecosystems and humans are particularly dependent on them for food. Dmitry Grigoriev / Unsplash

By Ajit Niranjan

Seven 'no-regret' actions could rescue insects on the road to extinction, a new roadmap for conservation says, helping ecosystems even where a lack of research means scientists cannot prove benefits to individual species.

Read More
Visitors to the Hollywood & Highland mall in Hollywood wear face masks on Jan. 27 . Five people in the U.S. have tested positive for the deadly strain of Coronavirus, one each in Washington, Illinois and Arizona, and two in Southern California, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

As a new coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, concerns have emerged that Trump administration cuts to science and health agencies have hampered the U.S. ability to respond.

Read More
Sponsored
Workers evacuate the Lonja del Comercio (Commerce Market) in Havana, Cuba after an earthquake rattled the island Tuesday. ADALBERTO ROQUE / AFP via Getty Images

A 7.7 magnitude earthquake shook the Caribbean Tuesday, rattling people from Miami to Mexico.

Read More
A roller coaster on the Jersey Shore flooded after Hurricane Sandy. Photo credit: Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.jpg: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen / U.S. Air Force / New Jersey National Guard / CC BY 2.0

New Jersey will be the first state in the U.S. to require builders to take the climate crisis into consideration before seeking permission for a project.

Read More
The Director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu speaks on Jan. 26 during a press briefing on studying the 2019-nCoV coronavirus and developing a vaccine to prevent it. Roman Balandin / TASS / Getty Images

Editor's note: The coronavirus that started in Wuhan has sickened more than 4,000 people and killed at least 100 in China as of Jan. 27, 2020. Thailand and Hong Kong each have reported eight confirmed cases, and five people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the illness. People are hoping for a vaccine to slow the spread of the disease.

Read More