Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

3 Hurdles Trump Still Faces to Finalize Keystone XL Pipeline

Energy
3 Hurdles Trump Still Faces to Finalize Keystone XL Pipeline

The State Department and the White House greenlit permits to build the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, with President Trump hailing the move as "a great day for American jobs."


State Department estimates indicate that the pipeline, which would transport more than 800,000 barrels of carbon-intensive Canadian tar sands oil per day, will only create 35 permanent jobs post-construction. The controversial pipeline still faces hurdles, including court challenges, intensified opposition from activists and approval from Nebraska's Public Service Commission to lay the pipeline in-state.

Jane Kleeb, the president of Bold Alliance and Nebraska Democrat Party chair, said that construction will likely be delayed from landowners in the state who are unhappy with TransCanada's use of eminent domain along the route. Bill Arnold, a professor of energy management at Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business and ex-Shell, argues that: "The biggest challenge to the pipeline now is not political. It is economic. Whether TransCanada will go forward with the project depends on its medium- and long-term price forecast."

While we're talking about pipelines—officials confirmed Friday that a December crude spill in North Dakota 150 miles away from the Dakota Access Pipeline protest site was three times larger than initially estimated.

For a deeper dive:

Keystone: AP, Washington Post, New York Times, WSJ, Politico Pro, Reuters, InsideClimate News, FastCompany, ThinkProgress, EcoWatch, Fusion, Mother Jones Jobs: CNN Money, MarketWatch, Quartz, Grist

ND spill: AP, Huffington Post, EcoWatch. Commentary: LA Times, Scott Martelle op-ed, Baltimore Sun editorial

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Milkyway from Segara Anak - Rinjani Mountain. Abdul Azis / Moment / Getty Images

By Dirk Lorenzen

2021 begins as a year of Mars. Although our red planetary neighbor isn't as prominent as it was last autumn, it is still noticeable with its characteristic reddish color in the evening sky until the end of April. In early March, Mars shines close to the star cluster Pleiades in the constellation Taurus.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda, Ph.D.

Despite a journey to this moment even more treacherous than expected, Americans now have a fresh opportunity to act, decisively, on climate change.

The authors of the many new books released in just the past few months (or scheduled to be published soon) seem to have anticipated this pivotal moment.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Marsh Creek in north-central California is the site of restoration project that will increase residents' access to their river. Amy Merrill

By Katy Neusteter

The Biden-Harris transition team identified COVID-19, economic recovery, racial equity and climate change as its top priorities. Rivers are the through-line linking all of them. The fact is, healthy rivers can no longer be separated into the "nice-to-have" column of environmental progress. Rivers and streams provide more than 60 percent of our drinking water — and a clear path toward public health, a strong economy, a more just society and greater resilience to the impacts of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less
A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less