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3 Hurdles Trump Still Faces to Finalize Keystone XL Pipeline

Energy

The State Department and the White House greenlit permits to build the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, with President Trump hailing the move as "a great day for American jobs."


State Department estimates indicate that the pipeline, which would transport more than 800,000 barrels of carbon-intensive Canadian tar sands oil per day, will only create 35 permanent jobs post-construction. The controversial pipeline still faces hurdles, including court challenges, intensified opposition from activists and approval from Nebraska's Public Service Commission to lay the pipeline in-state.

Jane Kleeb, the president of Bold Alliance and Nebraska Democrat Party chair, said that construction will likely be delayed from landowners in the state who are unhappy with TransCanada's use of eminent domain along the route. Bill Arnold, a professor of energy management at Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business and ex-Shell, argues that: "The biggest challenge to the pipeline now is not political. It is economic. Whether TransCanada will go forward with the project depends on its medium- and long-term price forecast."

While we're talking about pipelines—officials confirmed Friday that a December crude spill in North Dakota 150 miles away from the Dakota Access Pipeline protest site was three times larger than initially estimated.

For a deeper dive:

Keystone: AP, Washington Post, New York Times, WSJ, Politico Pro, Reuters, InsideClimate News, FastCompany, ThinkProgress, EcoWatch, Fusion, Mother Jones Jobs: CNN Money, MarketWatch, Quartz, Grist

ND spill: AP, Huffington Post, EcoWatch. Commentary: LA Times, Scott Martelle op-ed, Baltimore Sun editorial

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