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So This Is How Trump Gets His Fake News

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Have you been wondering where President Trump gets his fake news? According to a stunning POLITICO story, White House senior officials are literally slipping him bogus information to get a political edge.


K.T. McFarland—the second in command of the National Security Council—reportedly handed Trump a 100 percent doctored Time magazine cover that claims the world is cooling. The president, who famously believes that global warming is a hoax, apparently ate it up.Per the report:

"K.T. McFarland, the deputy national security adviser, had given Trump a printout of two Time magazine covers. One, supposedly from the 1970s, warned of a coming ice age; the other, from 2008, about surviving global warming, according to four White House officials familiar with the matter.

"Trump quickly got lathered up about the media's hypocrisy. But there was a problem. The 1970s cover was fake, part of an Internet hoax that's circulated for years. Staff chased down the truth and intervened before Trump tweeted or talked publicly about it."

The cover on the left is fake.

Incidentally, White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, the former driving force behind the alt-right Breitbart News, once cited the faked cover to deny climate change.

Here's another alarming detail from the POLITICO report. A White House official commented on the matter, calling it an honest error that was "fake but accurate."

"While the specific cover is fake, it is true there was a period in the 70s when people were predicting an ice age," the official said. "The broader point I think was accurate."

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