Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Trump Compares Coronavirus to 'Sniffles' as U.S. Death Toll Tops 140,000

Politics
Trump Compares Coronavirus to 'Sniffles' as U.S. Death Toll Tops 140,000
Trump walks the colonnade before arriving to speak on the South Lawn at the White House on July 16, 2020 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Donald Trump continued to downplay the severity of the coronavirus pandemic one day after the U.S. death toll passed 140,000, according to a Reuters tally.


"Many of those cases are young people that would heal in a day," Trump said in an interview with Fox News Sunday, as NPR reported. "They have the sniffles, and we put it down as a test."

Also on Saturday, the global death toll rose past 600,000, Johns Hopkins University said, as The Associated Press reported. The world also broke its record for the most new cases reported in a day, with 259,848. The U.S. continues to lead the world in both deaths and cases. Out of more than 14.5 million cases worldwide, it is responsible for more than 3.7 million of them, according to Monday morning figures from Johns Hopkins University.

Trump's remarks came during a discussion of the rising U.S. caseload with Fox News host Chris Wallace, Business Insider explained.

During the interview, Trump claimed that the rising case count was due to an increase in testing.

"We go out into parking lots, and everything, everybody gets a test. We find, if we did half the testing — with all of that being said, I'm glad we did it, this is the right way to do it. I'm glad we did what we're doing, but we have more tests by far than anywhere else in the world," he said, as Business Insider reported.

Wallace challenged that the rise in cases could not only be attributed to more tests — while testing has increased 37 percent, cases have increased 194 percent, he said.

"it isn't just that the testing has gone up but that the virus has spread, the positivity rate has increased, the virus is worse than it was," Wallace pointed out.

It was at this point that Trump said most of those cases were "sniffles" that would never have been uncovered if it weren't for extensive testing.

This isn't the first time that Trump has diminished the seriousness of the new disease. In March, he told Fox's Sean Hannity that people with mild cases could go to work and get better. This contradicted Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advice that anyone exhibiting symptoms should stay home and contact a doctor.

Wallace challenged Trump on another of his falsely optimistic statements about the virus, that it would "disappear."

"I'll be right eventually," Trump asserted, according to NPR.

Despite Trump's claims about the severity of COVID-19 cases, both deaths and hospitalizations are on the rise, Business Insider pointed out. Deaths have risen from 473 per day on average for the week of July 4 to 768 per day on average the week of July 18. Around 5,000 Americans are now dying of the virus weekly, according to Reuters. Meanwhile, Canada has reported 8,800 coronavirus deaths total.

People across New England witnessed a dramatic celestial event Sunday night.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Visitors look at a Volkswagen ID.4 electric car at the Autostadt promotional facility next to the Volkswagen factory on Oct. 26, 2020 in Wolfsburg, Germany. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

By David Reichmuth

Over the last month, I've seen a number of opinion articles attacking electric vehicles (EVs). Sadly, this comes as no surprise: now that the Biden administration is introducing federal policies to accelerate the roll out of electric vehicles, we were bound to see a reaction from those that oppose reducing climate changing emissions and petroleum use.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A woman walks along The Embarcadero under an orange smoke-filled sky in San Francisco, California on September 9, 2020. Brittany Hosea-Small / AFP / Getty Images

Smoke from wildfires may be more harmful to public health than other sources of particulate matter air pollution, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less
China's new five-year plan could allow further expansion of its coal industry. chuyu / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On Friday, China set out an economic blueprint for the next five years, which was expected to substantiate the goal set out last fall by President Xi Jinping for the country to reach net-zero emissions before 2060 and hit peak emissions by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Trans Canada Trail and AccessNow partnership for AccessOutdoors / Trails for All project. Mapping day on Capital Pathway in Ottawa, Ontario with Camille Bérubé. Daniel Baylis

The Great Trail in Canada is recognized as the world's longest recreational trail for hiking, biking, and cross-country skiing. Created by the Trans Canada Trail (TCT) and various partners, The Great Trail consists of a series of smaller, interconnected routes that stretch from St. John's to Vancouver and even into the Yukon and Northwest Territories. It took nearly 25 years to connect the 27,000 kilometers of greenway in ways that were safe and accessible to hikers. Now, thanks to a new partnership with the Canadian Paralympic Committee and AccessNow, the TCT is increasing accessibility throughout The Great Trail for people with disabilities.

Read More Show Less