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Trump Touts Clean Coal as Canada Phases Out the Dirty Energy

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Trump Touts Clean Coal as Canada Phases Out the Dirty Energy

In a brief video message outlining goals for the first 100 days of his presidency, Donald Trump stated he would cancel "job-killing restrictions on the production of American energy, including shale energy and clean coal."

"This plan would put America 100 days further behind where we need to be to address climate change and 100 days closer to the planetary tipping point," Greenpeace USA spokesperson Cassady Craighill said. "Trump seems determined to reverse American progress with his promises to federally champion coal and other fossil fuels despite the scientific evidence this would be a disaster."

At a recent meeting, Trump allegedly encouraged British politician Nigel Farage to oppose an offshore wind farm near Trump-owned Scottish golf courses, while the president-elect's friendly stance towards gas pipelines combined with his investment in the Dakota Access Pipeline is also inviting scrutiny.

And, while the struggling U.S. coal industry eagerly awaits an unlikely but promised boost from the incoming president-elect, Canada announced plans to accelerate its renewable transition and phase out the use of coal-fired power plants by 2030.

Canadian Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said the goal is to increase the country's clean energy use, currently at 80 percent, to 90 percent, while cutting the emissions equivalent to taking 1.5 million cars off the road.

For a deeper dive:

Trump:

Video message: New York Times, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, Climate Home, Fox News, Guardian

Conflict-of-interest: New York Times, Sunday Express, Motherboard

Canada:

News: AP, Reuters, Wall Street Journal, The Hill, Bloomberg, CNBC

Commentary: Regina Leader-Post editorial

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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