Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Trump Chooses Climate Skeptic as New Energy Adviser

Climate
Trump Chooses Climate Skeptic as New Energy Adviser

Republican presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump picked Rep. Kevin Cramer (R) of North Dakota as his energy adviser. Cramer is widely known as a strong supporter of oil and gas drilling as well as a climate change skeptic.

Republican presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump picked Rep. Kevin Cramer (R) of North Dakota as his energy adviser. Photo credit: Wikipedia

In an interview, Cramer said he may advise Trump to address global warming because “political populism believes that there needs [to be] some addressing of climate change.” Initially it was reported that Cramer also expressed support for a carbon tax to replace the Clean Power Plan, but this was later denied by Trump and Cramer.

For a deeper dive: E&E News, The Hill, Christian Science Monitor, Reuters

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

With Clean Energy Jobs Booming in Republican Districts, It’s Time to Recalibrate Climate Politics

EPA Finalizes Methane Emissions Rules, New Regs Fail to ‘Stop Dangerous Methane Leaks From Existing Fracking Wells’

Big Oil Abandons the Arctic, Obama Under Pressure to Do More to Protect the Region

Obama to Make Historic Visit to Hiroshima as U.S. Quietly Upgrades Nuclear Arsenal

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Methane flares at a fracking site near a home in Colorado on Oct. 25, 2014. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

In the coming days, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to use its power to roll back yet another Obama-era environmental protection meant to curb air pollution and slow the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Researchers on the ICESCAPE mission, funded by NASA, examine melt ponds and their surrounding ice in 2011 to see how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the biological and chemical makeup of the ocean. NASA / Flickr

By Alex Kirby

The temperature of the Arctic matters to the entire world: it helps to keep the global climate fairly cool. Scientists now say that by 2035 there could be an end to Arctic sea ice.

Read More Show Less
President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
A John Deere agricultural tractor sits under a collapsed building following a derecho storm on Aug. 10, 2020 near Franklin Grove, Illinois. Daniel Acker / Getty Images

A powerful series of thunderstorms roared across the Midwest on Monday, downing trees, damaging structures and knocking out power to more than a million people.

Read More Show Less
A scenic view of West Papua. Reza Fakhrudin / Pexels

By Arkilaus Kladit

My name is Arkilaus Kladit. I'm from the Knasaimos-Tehit tribe in South Sorong Regency, West Papua Province, Indonesia. For decades my tribe has been fighting to protect our forests from outsiders who want to log it or clear it for palm oil. For my people, the forest is our mother and our best friend. Everything we need to survive comes from the forest: food, medicines, building materials, and there are many sacred sites in the forest.

Read More Show Less
Everyone overthinks their lives or options every once in a while. Some people, however, can't stop the wheels and halt their train of thoughts. Peter Griffith / Getty Images

By Farah Aqel

Overthinkers are people who are buried in their own obsessive thoughts. Imagine being in a large maze where each turn leads into an even deeper and knottier tangle of catastrophic, distressing events — that is what it feels like to them when they think about the issues that confront them.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A newly developed catalyst would transform carbon dioxide from power plants and other sources into ethanol. DWalker44 / E+ / Getty Images

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a cheap, efficient way to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuel, potentially reducing the amount of new carbon dioxide pumped into the atmosphere.

Read More Show Less