Quantcast

Trump Building Wall in Ireland to Keep Climate Change Out

Politics

Donald Trump has said numerous times in various places that he does not consider climate change to be a significant problem warranting corrective action. From calling it pseudoscience to a Chinese conspiracy to an elaborate hoax, he’s made it a point to take the Koch-approved stance, even as he disavows such big-money influence in politics. But as Politico’s Ben Schreckinger has uncovered, when it comes to his business and not campaign rhetoric, Trump apparently takes climate change seriously.

Ben Schreckinger has uncovered, when it comes to his business and not campaign rhetoric, Trump apparently takes climate change seriously. Photo credit: Shutterstock

At a minimum, those in charge of running one of Trump's golf courses in Ireland seem to be climate conscious. In a planning application, Trump asked for permission to construct a two-mile sea wall to keep the rising sea levels from eroding the golf course. The impact statement refers not only to the coastal erosion from rising seas, but also the even larger risk from storm systems amplified by global warming.

The company made this a public issue as well, distributing a brochure to locals to gain their support for coastal protection, which specifically mentions the sea level rise and storms that will increase coastal erosion. So while Trump's political rhetoric is full-on conspiracy theory denial, this business move shows a rational reaction to a known risk. As such, we can probably expect him to disavow this move to go green so he can keep making the greenbacks from his golf greens. Though the plan is to build a wall and we all know how he feels about that.

News that the Donald’s businesses take climate change seriously comes just after he’s made some unsurprising remarks about climate, specifically about how he would renegotiate the Paris climate agreement. Chris Mooney explained why those comments were “so bizarre” on a few different levels. Short version: Trump’s statement suggests he doesn’t have the foggiest idea what the Paris agreement accomplished, how it’s structured or what it represents.

Ever the optimists, though, we’d like to think that Trump’s insistence that he will hire the best people would mean that he would pick climate advisors from the 97 percent and not the frequently-wrong and less-expert deniers. And his adaptation plan in Ireland suggests that on some level, this is true. So perhaps if elected he would hire the best, heed their advice and acknowledge the reality of man-made climate change. And to prevent being a flip-flopper, he can use this Irish golf course as a way to tee up the pivot from far-right primary to moderate general election campaigning.

Unfortunately, at the campaign level this optimism seems as outlandish as Trump’s conspiracies since Donald is seeking energy advice from a pro-fossil fuel congressman from North Dakota. And even more unfortunately, when it comes to the high-profile issue of healthcare, even conservatives have lambasted his plan as being so bad that "to suggest it was pulled together by an unpaid campaign intern would be an insult to the capabilities of unpaid interns.” Someone from the free-market focused Cato institute called it “a series of ignorant, incoherent and self-contradictory verbal spasms.”

Which some might think suggests that it wasn’t an unpaid intern that wrote it, but Donald himself.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Trump Cannot Derail Paris Climate Deal

If President, Trump Would ‘Renegotiate’ Climate Deal

Trump Chooses Climate Skeptic as New Energy Adviser

With Clean Energy Jobs Booming in Republican Districts, It’s Time to Recalibrate Climate Politics

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A dire new report issued by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) found that the climate crisis is on a worrying trajectory as the crisis's hallmarks — sea level rise, ice loss and extreme weather — all increased over the last five years, which will end as the warmest five-year period on record.

Read More Show Less
Line of soldiers walking. Pexels

By Peter Gleick

War is a miserable thing. It kills and maims soldiers and civilians. It destroys infrastructure, cultures and communities. It worsens poverty and development challenges. And it damages and cripples vital ecological and environmental resources.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
People take part in a ceremony to mark the 'death' of the Pizol glacier on Sept. 22. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images

Hundreds of activists gathered in the Swiss Alps on Sunday to mourn the loss of Pizol, a glacier that has steadily retreated over the last decade as temperatures have warmed the mountain tops, according to CNN.

Read More Show Less
Luis Alfonso de Alba Gongora, the UN secretary-general's special envoy for the climate summit speaks at The World Economic Forum holds the Sustainable Development Impact Summit 2018 in New York on Sept. 24, 2018. Ben Hider / World Economic Forum

By Howard LaFranchi

When United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres decided to hold a high-level climate summit in conjunction with this year's General Assembly kicking off next week, he was well aware of the paradox of his initiative.

Read More Show Less
Acting U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan meets with Guatemalan farmers on May 29 in Santa Rosa, Guatemala. John Moore / Getty Images

The Trump administration ignored its own evidence on how climate change is impacting migration and food security when setting new policies for cutting aid to Central America, NBC reports.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Mike Pence brought the first motorcade to Mackinac Island on Saturday. Cars have been banned on the island since 1898. 13 ON YOUR SIDE / YouTube screenshot

Vice President Mike Pence sparked outrage on social media Saturday when he traveled in the first-ever motorcade to drive down the streets of Michigan's car-free Mackinac Island, HuffPost reported.

Read More Show Less
Inhaling from an electronic cigarette. 6okean / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Shawn Radcliffe

  • As illnesses and deaths linked to vaping continue to rise, health officials urge people to stop using e-cigarettes.
  • Officials report 8 deaths have been linked to lung illnesses related to vaping.
  • Vitamin E acetate is one compound officials are investigating as a potential cause for the outbreak.
The number of vaping-related illnesses has grown to 530 cases in 38 states and 1 U.S. territory, federal health officials reported.
Read More Show Less
Activist Greta Thunberg leads the Youth Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in New York City. Roy Rochlin / WireImage / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

As organizers behind Friday's Global Climate Strike reported that four million children and adults attended marches and rallies all over the world — making it the biggest climate protest ever — they assured leaders who have been reticent to take bold climate action that the campaigners' work is far from over.

Read More Show Less