Quantcast

Transitioning to a Post-Carbon Future

Insights + Opinion

Brad Masi

Our current industrial agricultural system, predicated on the availability of cheap energy and a stable climate in which to grow, faces two immediate threats—peaking oil production and destabilization of the global climate. Farming has always been a difficult enterprise and will only continue to be challenged by the rising cost of energy and an increasingly challenging climate—including more extensive droughts, heavier precipitation and flooding, and extreme weather events.

Unaddressed, climate change tops the list of issues that has the capacity to undermine the stability of societies, economies and the ecological systems upon which all life depends. Attentive public response to the issue to date has been nil. In the absence of significant national action, communities still possess significant power to create change, including efforts to develop sustainable local food systems. During a recent visit to Oberlin College, renowned author Bill McKibben noted that “as we are no longer able to use fossil fuels for industrial farming, either because we have run out of it or because we have realized the danger it presents to the atmosphere, we are going to have to start to figure out again how to get people back on the farm.”

McKibben suggested that, rather than think of this as a doomsday scenario, think of it as “one of the great opportunities for creative employment going forward.”

Oberlin, a small town with a student and resident population of about 10,000, is in the process of organizing a comprehensive community initiative to transition away from fossil-fuel dependency while mitigating its contributions to climate change. Named the Oberlin Project, the initiative involves a collaboration between Oberlin College, the City of Oberlin, the Oberlin City School District, and Oberlin community members.

One initiative of the Oberlin Project will build on a long history of leadership in local food systems development. David Orr, founder of the Oberlin Project, worked to initiate one of the first college-based local food purchasing initiatives in the country at Hendrix College in Arkansas in the mid 1980s. Orr worked with a group of Oberlin students to replicate the Hendrix project at Oberlin in the late 1980s. Today, the college purchases between 25-32 percent of its food from local sources.

Building on this legacy, the community is beginning to look at the potential for a 70 percent localization of its food supply. What could this level of localization mean for community wealth, job creation and quality of life? How can this system be designed for resilience in the light of a more challenging climate that threatens the very stability of all local food systems?

The Oberlin Project is supporting four sequences for local food systems development. The first assesses the pathways of innovation and entrepreneurship that led to Oberlin’s current levels of local food activity over the last 20 years. How can existing local food supply networks be expanded and how can new farmers and businesses enter into the local food space? This work will be carried out in conjunction with the Western Reserve Land Conservancy, which is developing a strategic plan for preserving a 20,000 acre network of farmland in Lorain and surrounding counties that can supply food, energy and materials to the local economy.

The second phase is a community investment portfolio designed in collaboration with the Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Center. This portfolio will look at how existing assets in the community can be more effectively leveraged while identifying additional assets needed to support growth of the local food economy. Assets are not just financial, but will include networks, time, knowledge, existing facilities and even passion.

The third phase will look at developing a regenerative agriculture learning institute that will link with a network of national and international food system innovators to create a portfolio of techniques that include carbon farming (methods for sequestering carbon in soils while improving topsoil conditions), rotational grazing, perennial polyculture systems, micro-farming, agro-forestry and community food development. This initiative is being developed in conjunction with the New Agrarian Center and will augment several sustainable agriculture and culinary arts initiatives at Oberlin College, Lorain County Community College and the Joint Vocational School in Oberlin.

The fourth initiative calls for development of a regional learning network that can link Oberlin and local food communities across Northeast Ohio to share best practices, innovations and inspirational stories, all aimed at accelerating overall learning in and growth of the regional food system in the region.

Meaningful action to address climate change and sustainable energy development may have disappeared from the national agenda, but a growing network of collaborating communities across Northeast Ohio and the nation have the power to lead the necessary transitions in the absence of national leadership.

For more information, click here or visit the Oberlin Project website by clicking here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Arx0nt / Moment / Getty Images

By Taylor Jones, RD

Oats are a highly nutritious grain with many health benefits.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

Get ready to toast bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. National Pollinator Week is June 17-23 and it's a perfect time to celebrate the birds, bugs and lizards that are so essential to the crops we grow, the flowers we smell, and the plants that produce the air we breathe.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Alexander Spatari / Moment / Getty Images

It seems like every day a new diet is declared the healthiest — paleo, ketogenic, Atkins, to name a few — while government agencies regularly release their own recommended dietary guidelines. But there may not be an ideal one-size-fits-all diet, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less
Logging shown as part of a thinning and restoration effort in the Deschutes National Forest in Oregon on Oct. 22, 2014. Oregon Department of Forestry / CC BY 2.0

The U.S Forest Service unveiled a new plan to skirt a major environmental law that requires extensive review for new logging, road building, and mining projects on its nearly 200 million acres of public land. The proposal set off alarm bells for environmental groups, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
Maskot / Getty Images

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to wonder which foods are healthiest.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Homes in Washington, DC's Brookland neighborhood were condemned to clear room for a highway in the 1960s. The community fought back. Brig Cabe / DC Public Library

By Teju Adisa-Farrar & Raul Garcia

In the summer of 1969 a banner hung over a set of condemned homes in what was then the predominantly black and brown Brookland neighborhood in Washington, DC. It read, "White man's roads through black men's homes."

Earlier in the year, the District attempted to condemn the houses to make space for a proposed freeway. The plans proposed a 10-lane freeway, a behemoth of a project that would divide the nation's capital end-to-end and sever iconic Black neighborhoods like Shaw and the U Street Corridor from the rest of the city.

Read More Show Less
Demonstrators outside a Republican presidential debate in Detroit in 2016. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Michigan prosecutors dropped all criminal charges against government officials involved in the Flint water crisis Thursday, citing concerns about the investigation they had inherited from the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) appointed by former Attorney General Bill Schuette, CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Samara Heisz / iStock / Getty Images

New York state has joined California, West Virginia, Arizona, Mississippi and Maine in ending religious exemptions for parents who prefer not to vaccinate their children, The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less