Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Top 20 Health Concerns Related to Fracking

Energy
Top 20 Health Concerns Related to Fracking

Grassroots Environmental Education

A fracking rig and operation stands among forests and fields in Bradford County, Pa. The state has been a hotbed of fracking activity and controversy over the exact impact of fracking has on groundwater, human health and the environment. Photo by Bob Warhover

Grassroots Environmental Education, a nonprofit organization that organized and facilitated meetings between medical professionals, scientists and senior staff from the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and New York Department of Health as well as representatives from the Governor's office, released a summary report today of those meetings which identifies 20 important public health concerns related to gas drilling in New York State. The report was delivered to meeting participants and the commissioners of both agencies this morning.

"As more independent science on hydrofracking operations becomes available, the full dimension of the potential health impacts is becoming more evident" says Patti Wood, executive director of Grassroots Environment Education and organizer of the meetings. "These are very serious issues, and the emerging science brings into question whether they can ever be answered successfully." 

The document released, Summary Report: Human Health Risks and Exposure Pathways of Proposed Horizontal Hydrofracking in New York State identifies twenty concerns discussed at the meetings or contained in documents furnished to participants. These include:

• Handling and disposal of radioactive wastewater and sludge

• Accidents involving transportation of radioactive/chemical waste

• Unpredicted synergistic catalyzation and interactions with radioactive material

• Groundwater contamination from leaking storage containers, abandoned wells and failed casings

• High levels of radon in natural gas from Marcellus shale

• Respirable crystalline silica exposure of workers and nearby populations

• Air contamination from diesel engines at drilling sites and in local communities

• Air contamination from flaring

• Impacts fall disproportionately on sensitive populations (children, elderly, pregnant women)

• Increased health care costs

"When there's a public health emergency, the primary objective is to stop the exposure," says Dr. David Brown, a public health toxicologist with the Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project which is helping sick people get medical care in areas of Pennsylvania with active fracking operations. "We try to help people whose water is contaminated and whose air is severely degraded. We tell them to test their water, stay inside, keep their windows closed, take their shoes off, that kind of thing. But really, at this point there are situations where there's not much we can do for them. There's no way for impacted individuals to stop the exposure." 

In addition to Dr. Brown, participants in the meetings in Albany included Dr. David Carpenter, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment, University at Albany; Dr. Ron Bishop, Department of Chemistry, SUNY Oneonta; Dr. Maya Shetreat-Klein, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Paul Rubin, HydroQuest; and Dr. Sheila Bushkin, public health and preventive medicine consultant.

"We fully support calls for an independent health impact assessment, and this report should not be interpreted as endorsing the internal review proposed by the DEC," says Wood. "But regardless of who does the assessment, each of the public health issues raised in this report must be thoroughly addressed before any decisions are made. Many of our experts concur that some of the more critical issues may indeed be irresolvable."

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less
Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less
The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch