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Top 10 Superfoods Ranked by Experts

Food
Top 10 Superfoods Ranked by Experts

In a first of its kind study, Jennifer Di Noia, PhD, an associate professor of sociology at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey ranked fruits and vegetables by their nutritional values. These "powerhouse fruits and vegetables" were ranked and scored by the amount of 17 critical nutrients they contain, including fiber, potassium, protein, calcium folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin D and other nutrients.

The study developed a definition for "powerhouse fruits and vegetables" as "foods providing, on average, 10 percent or more daily value per 100 kilocalories of the 17 qualifying nutrients." The objective of the research was to help consumers choose more nutrient-packed foods. The following is a list of the top 10 powerhouse fruits and vegetables:

1. Watercress (score: 100)

This peppery flavored aquatic plant has been in cultivation since ancient times for its food and medicinal uses in East-Asia, Central Asia, Europe, and Americas.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

2. Chinese Cabbage (score: 91.99)

3. Chard (score: 89.27)

4. Beet greens (score: 87.08)

5. Spinach (score: 86.43)

6. Chicory (score 73.36)

Chicory can be used in salads, or its root can be baked, ground or used as a coffee substitute.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

7. Leaf lettuce (score: 70.73)

8. Parsley (score: 65.59)

9. Romaine lettuce (score: 63.48)

10. Collard greens (score: 62.49)

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