Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Top 10 States Take the 'LEED' in Green Building

Business

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released today its annual list of the top 10 states for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). According to USGBC, LEED is "the world's most widely used and recognized green building rating system." USGBC ranked the states in terms of square feet of LEED space per state resident.

The Denver Museum of Nature and Science was certified in 2014. Photo credit: Michael Criswell

USGBC uses per-capita figures to allow for "a fair comparison of the level of green building taking place among states with significant differences in population and, accordingly, number of overall buildings."

Benefits of LEED-certified spaces include using less energy and water resources, saving money for families, businesses and taxpayers, reducing carbon emissions and creating a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community, according to USGBC.

Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair of USGBC, says, "This per-capita approach tells a great story about how LEED has become an important benchmark in the transformation of the nation’s built environment. LEED-certified buildings and the innovations they have driven contribute substantially to our national economic growth, create jobs and improve the quality of life in the communities where they are found."

Based on the 2010 Census data, this fifth annual list includes building projects that were certified through 2014. Illinois maintained its place at the top of the list for the second year in a row with 174 LEED certifications. Georgia and Arizona, two newcomers to the list, "show that 2014 was a year of major growth for LEED in the South and Southwest regions of the country," USGBC says.

Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC continue to do well, helping "the mid-Atlantic region remain the epicenter of green building across the country," says USGBC. While Washington, DC is not included on the official list due to its status as a federal territory, it continues to lead the nation with 29.44 square feet of space per resident in 2014.

Here are the top 10 states for LEED in 2014:

A sample of notable projects, according to USGBC, that certified in these states in 2014 include:

  • Illinois: The Aon Center, a 3.2 million-square-foot tower in Chicago managed by Jones Lang LaSalle, LEED Silver
  • Colorado: Denver Museum of Nature & Science’s Morgridge Family Exploration Center in Denver, LEED Platinum
  • Maryland: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Building 26 in Greenbelt, LEED Gold
  • Virginia: University of Mary Washington’s Technology Convergence Center in Fredericksburg, LEED Silver
  • Massachusetts: Winchester Hospital Ambulatory Surgery Center in Winchester, LEED Gold
  • Hawaii: City Financial Tower in Honolulu, LEED Gold
  • California: Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, LEED Gold
  • Georgia: The Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, LEED Silver
  • Minnesota: Wells Fargo Center in Minneapolis, LEED Gold
  • Arizona: Arizona State University Health Services renovation in Tempe, LEED Platinum
  • New York: Golisano Institute for Sustainability at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, LEED Platinum

More than 26,600 projects representing 3.6 billion square feet of space have been LEED-certified to date, with another 42,000 projects representing 8.8 billion square feet in the pipeline for certification, according to USGBC.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

10 Most Energy Efficient States

Sustainable Energy Revolution Grows, Says Bloomberg Report

3 Key Trends to Watch in Green Business

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Samantha Hepburn

In the expansion of its iron ore mine in Western Pilbara, Rio Tinto blasted the Juukan Gorge 1 and 2 — Aboriginal rock shelters dating back 46,000 years. These sites had deep historical and cultural significance.

Read More Show Less
Meadow Lake wind farm in Indiana. Anthony / CC BY-ND 2.0

By Tara Lohan

The first official tallies are in: Coronavirus-related shutdowns helped slash daily global emissions of carbon dioxide by 14 percent in April. But the drop won't last, and experts estimate that annual emissions of the greenhouse gas are likely to fall only about 7 percent this year.

Read More Show Less
Andrey Nikitin / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Adrienne Santos-Longhurst

Plants are awesome. They brighten up your space and give you a living thing you can talk to when there are no humans in sight.

Turns out, having enough of the right plants can also add moisture (aka humidify) indoor air, which can have a ton of health benefits.

Read More Show Less
A bald eagle chick inside a nest in Rutland, Massachusetts. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
A bald eagle nest with eggs has been discovered in Cape Cod for the first time in 115 years, according to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (Mass Wildlife), as Newsweek reported.
Read More Show Less
The office of Rover.com sits empty with employees working from home due to the coronavirus pandemic on March 12 in Seattle, Washington. John Moore / Getty Images

The office may never look the same again. And the investment it will take to protect employees may force many companies to go completely remote. That's after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new recommendations for how workers can return to the office safely.

Read More Show Less
Frederic Edwin Church's The Icebergs reveal their danger as a crush vessel is in the foreground of an iceberg strewn sea, 1860. Buyenlarge / Getty Images

Scientists and art historians are studying art for signs of climate change and to better understand the ways Western culture's relationship to nature has been altered by it, according to the BBC.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Esben Østergaard, co-founder of Lifeline Robotics and Universal Robots, takes a swab in the World's First Automatic Swab Robot, developed with Thiusius Rajeeth Savarimuthu, professor at the Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute at The University of Southern Denmark. The University of Southern Denmark

By Richard Connor

The University of Southern Denmark on Wednesday announced that its researchers have developed the world's first fully automatic robot capable of carrying out throat swabs for COVID-19.

Read More Show Less