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Tiny House Festival Expected to Be Huge

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Tiny House Festival Expected to Be Huge

The first official Tiny House Jamboree in Colorado Springs, Colorado this upcoming weekend might be a seen as a sign that tiny living is finally becoming mainstream. The festival is expected to be the largest such gathering of tiny house enthusiasts with up to 10,000 participants already registered for the three-day event. "This unique event is centered around the tiny house craze, a social movement rooted in the countercultural idea that it’s better to live small than large," organizers said. And best of all, it's free to attend.

Some very big names in the tiny house movement will speak at the event, including Andrew Morrison of Tiny House Build, Derek "Deek" Diedricksen of Relax Shacks, Jay Shafer of Four Lights Houses and Zack Giffin Tiny House Nation. There will be many more speakers as well as products for sale. And of course, no festival is complete without food trucks, music and prizes.

"The main attraction will be a tiny-house-community style display area where professional builders are showcasing their unique tiny models," say the organizers. And many attendees are even planning on bringing their own tiny homes to the festival.

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