Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Tim DeChristopher's Release from Prison Inspires Earth Day Theatrical Release of Bidder 70

Climate

Gathr Films

In celebration of Earth Day, environmental documentary Bidder 70 will be shown in theaters across the country on April 22. Documenting activist Tim DeChristopher's trial and conviction for disrupting a federal oil and gas lease auction in Utah, the film will screen one day after his release from federal prison.

As previously reported, the 31-year-old received a two-year prison sentence in 2011 for bidding on, and winning, millions of dollars worth of land parcels under false pretenses at a Bureau of Land Management auction in 2008.

DeChristopher's case also drew attention from environmentalists, including many who saw him as acting in the name of conservation and climate action. He was "acting on behalf of every landscape left on the planet," argued author Bill McKibben.

The film, which is being distributed by Gathr Films, will be released in a crowd-funded "theatrical-on-demand" format. Individuals must order a ticket in advance, but they will only be charged if the demand warrants a screening in their location.

Following the Earth Day screening, filmgoers will be able to watch a live-streamed question and answer session with DeChristopher and filmmakers Beth and George Gage, according to Gathr.

Gathr founder and CEO Scott Glosserman said in a press release, "Having Tim at the Salt Lake screening to talk about his experience, the day after his release from the federal prison system, is amazing, and being able to stream that discussion to audiences all over the country is truly special."

For more information about the film, click here. Tickets are available for purchase at Gathr Film.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY and CLIMATE CHANGE pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Animal rights activists try to save dogs at a free market ahead of the Yulin Dog Eating Festival in Yulin city, south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on June 21, 2014. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

The Chinese city of Shenzhen announced Thursday that it would ban the eating of dogs and cats in the wake of the coronavirus, which is believed to have stemmed from the wildlife trade, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
The Great Barrier Reef, where record-high sea temperatures in February caused its most widespread coral bleaching event. JAYNE JENKINS / CORAL REEF IMAGE BANK

Tropical coral reefs are at a critical tipping point, and we've pushed them there, scientists say. Climate change may now cause previously rare, devastating coral bleaching events to occur in tropical coral reefs around the globe on a 'near-annual' basis, reported The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
The first peer-reviewed research into a promising coronavirus vaccine was published Thursday. Javier Zayas Photography / Moment / Getty Images

The world has reached a grim milestone with the number of confirmed coronavirus cases reported by the Johns Hopkins University tracker passing one million.

Read More Show Less