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Three States Push Bills to Require Teaching Climate Change Denial in Schools

Climate
Three States Push Bills to Require Teaching Climate Change Denial in Schools

Environmental Action

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

The front group for the pollution industry has convinced three states to consider bills that, if passed, would require public schools to teach a so-called "balanced" view of global warming, in which the massive scientific proof of of man-made global warming is paired with the polluters' unscientific climate change denial.

Oklahoma, Colorado and Arizona's Legislatures are debating similar bills, all written by the pollution industry front group, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). The bills all refer to global warming as a "theory" and a "controversy" with scientific weaknesses. The Oklahoma bills say that students need to "develop critical thinking skills they need in order to become intelligent, productive and scientifically informed citizens."

That last bit is not an attempt at humor. ALEC wants to promote the false notion that there is some debate as to whether temperatures are rising faster and higher than normal and that this increase is connected to man-made carbon emissions, which are also rising fast. "Critical thinking skills," in ALEC's mind, means covering your ears and repeating "nah nah nah" whenever a scientist talks about global warming.

Scientists almost unanimously agree that the rise in carbon emissions is directly linked to rising temperatures. They also agree that rising temperatures not only exceed any normal historical fluctuations in the global climate, but that higher temps are responsible for the rise in extreme weather, the melting of the polar ice caps, rising sea levels and more.

ALEC is comprised of corporate lobbyists who write bills that well-greased lawmakers then introduce to Congress and State Legislatures nation-wide. ALEC gets most of its funding from the fossil fuel industry, and its interests are solely to protect the industry's bottom line. 

As Americans wake up to the reality of climate change, the corporate polluters responsible for global warming would prefer to put us back to sleep. They want us to lie in a warm blanket of cozy lies, and because their propaganda is not working as well with adults anymore, the polluters are targeting our children. 

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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