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Thousands to Protest Fracking in D.C. on Saturday

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Thousands to Protest Fracking in D.C. on Saturday

Stop the Frack Attack

Activists gather in Washington DC calling on Congress to take immediate action to stop dangerous fracking.

Thousands of “fracktivists” are traveling to Washington, D.C. this week for Stop the Frack Attack, the first national protest to stop dirty and dangerous fracking. The three-day summit that began on July 26 will culminate in a rally on the West Lawn of the Capitol on Saturday, July 28 at 2 p.m., followed by a march at 3:30 p.m. to the headquarters of America’s Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute.

More than 130 local and national organizations are joining the summit to call on Congress to take action to protect community rights, public health, drinking water and the global climate from the impacts of fracking. They will also demand the closure of legal loopholes that allow the oil and gas industry to ignore parts of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act and other bedrock environmental laws.

Who: 136 local, state and national organizations and thousands of fracktivists, environmentalists and climate activists.

Tour De Frack, the anti-fracking bicyclist-activist group, biked from Butler, PA to Washington, DC to lobby Congress about the harmful effects of fracking and to partake in the first national protest to stop fracking.

Speakers include: Bill McKibben, board president and co-founder of 350.org; Josh Fox, producer of Gasland; Calvin Tillman, former mayor of Dish, Texas; Allison Chin, board president of the Sierra Club, and community members from swing states affected by fracking.

What: First national mobilization to “Stop the Frack Attack"

Where: West Lawn of the Capitol

When: 2 p.m., Saturday, July 28, followed by a march to America’s Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute departing from the Capitol at 3:30 p.m.

Visuals: Thousands of activists in front of the U.S. Capitol building with signs and banners calling on Congress to take immediate action to stop dangerous fracking. Activists in hazmat suits will deliver jugs of contaminated water to the headquarters of the America’s Natural Gas Alliance and large drilling rigs will transform into windmills in front of the American Petroleum Institute headquarters.

The full schedule for Stop the Frack Attack is available by clicking here.

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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