Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Thousands to Protest Fracking in D.C. on Saturday

Energy

Stop the Frack Attack

Activists gather in Washington DC calling on Congress to take immediate action to stop dangerous fracking.

Thousands of “fracktivists” are traveling to Washington, D.C. this week for Stop the Frack Attack, the first national protest to stop dirty and dangerous fracking. The three-day summit that began on July 26 will culminate in a rally on the West Lawn of the Capitol on Saturday, July 28 at 2 p.m., followed by a march at 3:30 p.m. to the headquarters of America’s Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute.

More than 130 local and national organizations are joining the summit to call on Congress to take action to protect community rights, public health, drinking water and the global climate from the impacts of fracking. They will also demand the closure of legal loopholes that allow the oil and gas industry to ignore parts of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act and other bedrock environmental laws.

Who: 136 local, state and national organizations and thousands of fracktivists, environmentalists and climate activists.

Tour De Frack, the anti-fracking bicyclist-activist group, biked from Butler, PA to Washington, DC to lobby Congress about the harmful effects of fracking and to partake in the first national protest to stop fracking.

Speakers include: Bill McKibben, board president and co-founder of 350.org; Josh Fox, producer of Gasland; Calvin Tillman, former mayor of Dish, Texas; Allison Chin, board president of the Sierra Club, and community members from swing states affected by fracking.

What: First national mobilization to “Stop the Frack Attack"

Where: West Lawn of the Capitol

When: 2 p.m., Saturday, July 28, followed by a march to America’s Natural Gas Alliance and the American Petroleum Institute departing from the Capitol at 3:30 p.m.

Visuals: Thousands of activists in front of the U.S. Capitol building with signs and banners calling on Congress to take immediate action to stop dangerous fracking. Activists in hazmat suits will deliver jugs of contaminated water to the headquarters of the America’s Natural Gas Alliance and large drilling rigs will transform into windmills in front of the American Petroleum Institute headquarters.

The full schedule for Stop the Frack Attack is available by clicking here.

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Protesters face off against security during the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

In just two weeks, three states have passed laws criminalizing protests against fossil fuel infrastructure.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump and Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listen to White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx speak in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

President Donald Trump has bowed to the advice of public health experts and extended social distancing measures designed to slow the spread of the new coronavirus till at least April 30.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Charli Shield

At unsettling times like the coronavirus outbreak, it might feel like things are very much out of your control. Most routines have been thrown into disarray and the future, as far as the experts tell us, is far from certain.

Read More Show Less