Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Thousands of Walruses Stranded Ashore in Alaska Once Again Due to Rapidly Melting Sea Ice

Climate

In what has now become a regular occurrence, thousands of walruses are being forced ashore on a remote barrier island in Alaska, threatening their survival. Walruses use sea ice to rest and feed. But with Arctic sea ice hitting a new low this past winter and fears that the Arctic could be entirely ice-free in summer months by the 2030s, walruses have no choice but to crowd ashore in mass numbers.

The first reported sighting this year was earlier this week. Gary Braasch, an environmental photographer, told The Guardian he first spotted the walruses coming ashore on the southern end of the barrier island, about two miles from the hamlet of Point Lay. The mass stranding comes ahead of President Obama's visit to Alaska to shed a spotlight on the toll climate change is taking on the Arctic region.

Last year, upwards of 35,000 walruses were forced ashore, setting a record. U.S. government agencies and the Native village of Point Lay ask that the media refrain from visiting the community to film or "sightsee" as "the walruses need space to reduce disturbance and possible trampling of animals." Since at least 2007, due to the loss of sea ice in the Chukchi Sea, "walrus females and calves are coming ashore in the late summer/early fall in large numbers near the community," said U.S Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and U.S. Geological Survey in a joint statement.

Thousands of walruses are once again forced ashore due to rapidly melting Arctic sea ice. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries

The site has been occupied by as many as 20,000 to 40,000 animals at its peak, according to Jim MacCracken, supervisory wildlife biologist with the USFWS. Scientists worry that any disturbances could lead to large stampedes, which injure and kill some walruses, especially calves.

"Last year, it was estimated that 60 young walruses were killed because of the sheer number of animals gathered together," said the agencies. The noise from overhead aircraft is of particular concern, and the agencies are considering placing temporary flight restrictions within the vicinity of the "haulout"—the term given to when walruses rest and feed in coastal areas during their migration.

Last year, an estimated 35,000-40,000 walruses were stranded near the Village of Point Lay on a remote barrier island in Alaska. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries

It's common for Pacific walruses to use coastal haulouts for resting during the fall southward migration, the agencies explained. Adult males, in particular, routinely use coastal haulouts along the Bering Sea in both Russia and the U.S. during the summer months, as evidenced by this live cam of 14,000 walruses relaxing on an Alaskan island. But females and their calves prefer to rest and feed more on ice floes until they begin to migrate back to the Bering Sea for the winter.

"Ice floes provide protection from predators, allow walrus to haul out in smaller groups and provide easy access to feeding areas below," said the agencies. With Alaska and the rest of the Arctic rapidly warming, that leaves walruses no choice but to come ashore.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

30 Whales Have Died Off the Coast of Alaska and No One Knows Why

Historic Wildfire Season Has Burned More Than 7.5 Million Acres (That’s Larger Than Massachusetts)

Sea Level Rising Faster Than Expected, NASA Warns

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Shawna Foo

Anyone who's tending a garden right now knows what extreme heat can do to plants. Heat is also a concern for an important form of underwater gardening: growing corals and "outplanting," or transplanting them to restore damaged reefs.

Read More Show Less
Malte Mueller / Getty Images

By David Korten

Our present course puts humans on track to be among the species that expire in Earth's ongoing sixth mass extinction. In my conversations with thoughtful people, I am finding increasing acceptance of this horrific premise.

Read More Show Less
Women sort potatoes in the Andes Mountains near Cusco Peru on July 7, 2014. Thomas O'Neill / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Alejandro Argumedo

August 9 is the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples – a celebration of the uniqueness of the traditions of Quechua, Huli, Zapotec, and thousands of other cultures, but also of the universality of potatoes, bananas, beans, and the rest of the foods that nourish the world. These crops did not arise out of thin air. They were domesticated over thousands of years, and continue to be nurtured, by Indigenous people. On this day we give thanks to these cultures for the diversity of our food.

Read More Show Less
A sand tiger shark swims over the USS Tarpon in Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. Tane Casserley / NOAA

By John R. Platt

Here at The Revelator, we love a good shark story.

The problem is, there aren't all that many good shark stories. According to recent research, sharks and their relatives represent one of the world's most imperiled groups of species. Of the more than 1,250 known species of sharks, skates, rays and chimeras — collectively known as chondrichthyan fishes — at least a quarter are threatened with extinction.

Read More Show Less
The Anderson Community Group. Left to right, Caroline Laur, Anita Foust, the Rev. Bryon Shoffner, and Bill Compton, came together to fight for environmental justice in their community. Anderson Community Group

By Isabella Garcia

On Thanksgiving Day 2019, right after Caroline Laur had finished giving thanks for her home, a neighbor at church told her that a company had submitted permit requests to build an asphalt plant in their community. The plans indicated the plant would be 250 feet from Laur's backdoor.

Read More Show Less
Berber woman cooks traditional flatbread using an earthen oven in her mud-walled village home located near the historic village of Ait Benhaddou in Morocco, Africa on Jan. 4, 2016. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd. /NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Danielle Nierenberg and Jason Flatt

The world's Indigenous Peoples face severe and disproportionate rates of food insecurity. While Indigenous Peoples comprise 5 percent of the world's population, they account for 15 percent of the world's poor, according to the World Health Organization.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Danny Choo / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Olivia Sullivan

One of the many unfortunate outcomes of the coronavirus pandemic has been the quick and obvious increase in single-use plastic products. After COVID-19 arrived in the United States, many grocery stores prohibited customers from using reusable bags, coffee shops banned reusable mugs, and takeout food with plastic forks and knives became the new normal.

Read More Show Less