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Thousands Draw the Line Protesting the Keystone XL Pipeline

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Thousands Draw the Line Protesting the Keystone XL Pipeline

EcoWatch

Thousands of people in hundreds of places across the U.S. joined together on Saturday in protest of the Keystone XL pipeline and dirty tar sands oil. Organized by 350.org, the nationwide action, Draw the Line, sent a strong message to President Obama that Americans want him to reject the Keystone XL.

According to 350.org, 350 Seattle had more than a thousand people draw the line between the Puget Sound and the train tracks that could lead to exporting an inflated fossil fuel dependency. In Texas, folks drew the line against the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline right on TransCanada's home turf. In New Orleans, a marching band drew the line against continued threats to the Gulf Coast communities. In Nebraska, landowners built a barn on the line of the proposed northern segment of the Keystone XL pipeline. In Detroit, the line was drawn between residents and refineries burning tar sands.

Draw the Line event in New York City, NY.

 

Drawing the line against Keystone XL in St. Louis, MO.

 

350 activists in Asheville, NC, show their support and hometown pride for the scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Photo credit: Greg Yost

Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.

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