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This Viral Meme Says it All

Last month, ForestEthics posted this picture on Facebook with the simple caption "so true," and it has since gone viral:

This meme posted by ForestEthics has gone viral on Facebook. Photo credit: ForestEthics Facebook page

Greenpeace International shared the image the other day, asking "Did you connect with nature today?"

Recent studies have shown that living close to nature improves mental healthOne study even found that adding 10 or more trees to a city block offered benefits to individuals equivalent to earning $10,000 more a year, moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being seven years younger. There are just so many reasons you feel good in nature.

David Suzuki warned that there are serious consequences from losing connection to the natural world. "If we disconnect from the natural world, we become disconnected from who we are—to the detriment of our health and the health of the ecosystems on which our well-being and survival depend," he said.

So, for your health and the health of the planet, go ahead and plan your next outdoor adventure.

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