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This Super Sustainable House Can Be Built in One Day

Business

A Dutch design firm has redefined living by creating a house that doesn't need a foundation, can be built in one day and is three times more sustainable than a normal house.

Photo credit: Wikkelhouse

The Wikkelhouse, designed by Fiction Factory in Amsterdam, is built by snapping multiple 1.2 meter (4 feet) wide sections together. Each section is made by wrapping a basic house shape with curved edges in 24 layers of cardboard that are glued together. The sections are then finished with waterproof, breathable foil and covered with a layer of wood paneling for extra protection.

"Using cardboard as its main building material, Wikkelhouse is a cutting-edge sustainable house with a beautiful design and exceptional constructive strength," the website explains.

With the flexible construction process, a house can range from the standard order of three sections to as many as desired.

Each section of the Wikkelhouse only weighs 500 kilos (1,100 pounds). It can be taken apart and moved easily when you want to relocate or remodel. You can place the house on the beach, in your backyard or even on top of a building, Fiction Factory boasts.

Photo credit: Wikkelhouse

Despite being lightweight, the Wikkelhouse is durable and has a minimum life span of 50 years. The wood outer layer is designed to protect the house from all types of weather elements and events. The cardboard layers also provide maximum insulation, cutting down on energy costs for the owner.

The Wikkelhouse is designed to accommodate a kitchen, bathroom and bedrooms, making it fully functional. Customers can pick the inside wall and floor design as well as glazed or opaque facades.

Photo credit: Wikkelhouse

Fiction Factory only produces 12 homes a year to maintain optimum quality control, each selling for 25,000 Euros or around $28,000. There is a wait list for orders.

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