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This Green-Roofed Hobbit Home Can Be Built in Just 3 Days

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These new homes will have you living like a hobbit.

Green Magic Homes, a company out of Mexico, has designed homes that will literally let you live underground. The basic structure of the homes is versatile, making them perfect for desert or snow conditions.

Photo credit: Green Magic Homes

The walls, which are durable and waterproof, are made out of composite laminate materials and then confined by soil. The layer of soil helps insulate the building, keeping it warm in the winter and hot in the summer.

Photo credit: Green Magic Homes

The basic structure can be built in just three days and doesn't require a specific skill set to do so. The buildings can be made as big or as small as desired. And if you're not sure about a home, the building can be used for multiple purposes such as businesses, schools, hotels and more, Green Magic Homes touts.

Once the house is covered with soil, grass or even crops can grow on top of it helping with stormwater management and saving energy.

Photo credit: Green Magic Homes

Green Magic Homes charges $1 per square foot with a minimum order total of $500.

This video posted by Hashem Al-Ghaili on Facebook gives a virtual tour of the homes:

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