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These 10 Superfoods Can Help Balance Your Hormones and Reduce Inflammation

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These 10 Superfoods Can Help Balance Your Hormones and Reduce Inflammation

Hormonal imbalances and inflammation are common conditions in the U.S. They are often the culprit behind symptoms such as joint pain, fatigue, high blood pressure, headaches and bloating. Unfortunately they can also increase the risk of more serious diseases, such as cancer and diabetes.

The good news? Eating certain foods will help balance your hormones and reduce inflammation. To help lower your risk for disease, try adding more of the following to your diet.

1. Apples

Apples are rich in quercetin, an antioxidant that reduces inflammation. Research shows that apples fight high blood pressure, reduce risk of cancer, fight viral infections and much more.

Apples are also the perfect fruit for weight loss since they’re nutrient dense, low in calories and rich in fiber.

2. Blueberries

Blueberries are not only sweet, but they also have high antioxidant activity. Eat three or four cups of blueberries per week.

Blueberries actually have numerous other health benefits; they improve heart health, prevent urinary tract infections, improve vision and much more.

3. Wild Caught Salmon

Wild caught salmon is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids and protein. Research shows that salmon reduces inflammation and helps control insulin.

4. Spinach

Spinach is a nutrient dense food and a great source of a plant steroid (phytoecdysteroids), which has been proven to boost metabolism and lower insulin levels.

5. Green Tea

You probably already know some of the numerous health benefits of green tea. Studies suggest that it boosts metabolism.

Green tea also contains theanine, a compound which reduces the release of cortisol (a stress hormone). It also has antioxidants that reduce inflammation and lower risk of disease.

6. Avocado

Avocado is one of the healthiest fruits in the world. It is rich in healthy fats and fiber. According to research, avocado reduces absorption of estrogen and boosts testosterone levels.

Research also shows that avocado will improve your heart health. Note that avocados are high in calories so eat them in moderation. One-fourth of an avocado per day is a good serving size to aim for.

7. Almonds

Almonds help regulate blood sugar levels, which consequently reduces the risk of type II diabetes. They also help reduce bad cholesterol in the body. Almonds, like most nuts, are high in calories so enjoy them in moderation.

8. Broccoli

Broccoli contains a natural compound called glucosinolates, which helps reduce the risk of estrogen-linked cancer. One cup of broccoli will give enough supply of vitamin C per day.

Broccoli will also give you potassium, calcium and magnesium. These minerals improve muscle functionality and strengthen bones.

9. Flaxseeds

Flaxseeds are rich in antioxidants, fiber and healthy fats. Whole flaxseeds pass through the intestines without being digested, so buy ground flaxseeds or grind them yourself.

10. Maca Root

Maca root is rich in minerals and fatty acids. You can consume it in capsule form or put it in beverages if it’s in powder form.

Weight loss goes beyond “calories in, calories out.” Balancing hormones and reducing inflammation will help you reach your weight goal faster, so eat these superfoods frequently.

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