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The Super Bowl Doritos Commercial You Didn't Get to See

The Super Bowl Doritos Commercial You Didn't Get to See

By Clara Chaisson

When Doritos announced its annual “Crash the Super Bowl" competition, which airs the winning fan-made commercial during the year's most coveted TV advertising opportunity, corporate watchdog SumOfUs answered with “The Ad Doritos Don't Want You to See."

In this commercial, what begins as a feel-good, cheesy romance ends with the couple abruptly discovering that PepsiCo, Doritos' parent company, is driving deforestation in Indonesia by purchasing unsustainably sourced palm oil.

Slash-and-burn agriculture and palm oil plantations contribute to habitat loss for endangered orangutans, out-of-control forest fires, greenhouse gas emissions and many more environmental horrors. Needless to say, the ad didn't win the contest (that honor went to “Doritos Dogs"), but it has already racked up more than 2.5 million views on YouTube.

Your move, Doritos. When it comes to the crunch the planet is feeling, don't just let the chips fall where they may.

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