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The Sky is Pink

Energy

Josh Fox

I know I don’t have to tell any of you what a vulnerable moment this is for New York and all New Yorkers. The New York Times has reported that Governor Andrew Cuomo will soon announce that drilling will be permitted in parts of the following five Southern Tier New York Counties—Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben and Tioga. The Governor’s office has made no official announcement as yet, but all indications suggest that the counties listed above will be the first to be sacrificed and that drilling may be permitted as early as this summer.

We’ve made a new short film, The Sky is Pink, which has just been released at Rolling Stone Magazine online. The Sky Is Pink details the shocking campaign of misinformation perpetuated by the gas industry, their flagrant disregard for the health and safety of the communities they ravage, and the historic decision that Governor Cuomo is about to make.

We’re telling Governor Cuomo that there are no expendable counties or communities in New York State and that we are not willing to allow the gas industry to exploit or endanger any of our fellow citizens. Governor Cuomo and his administration must be held to their promise to make decisions on behalf of New Yorkers based on sound science and they must provide the people of New York with a full Health Impact Assessment.  We demand that no weak compromises or deals are cut that send New York down the slippery slope toward a full-scale assault by the gas industry.

I’m asking you to help us make sure this film reaches far and wide. Clearly the 60,000 comments received by New York’s Department of Environmental Protection have been ignored. Clearly, we’re going to need to be even louder this time if we are going to be heard.

We need to tell Governor that hydraulic fracturing is not safe, not now, not ever and not in New York State.

Read Jeff Goodell's article at Rolling Stone Magazine.

Please, send it to everyone you know. Post it everywhere you can.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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