Quantcast

The People’s Climate March: A Time Where 'We' Can Make a Difference

Climate

Protecting the planet from the worst consequences of climate change is not an “I” issue, it’s a “We” issue, and notice we are using a capital “W.”  That’s why it’s important for as many people as possible to take part in the People’s Climate March in New York, the various other marches around the world, and the social media actions associated with them over the next week. The People’s Climate March on the 21st in New York is a chance for hundreds of thousands of people of all walks of life—from the business community to hundreds of youth groups, and everyone in between—to show that “We,” as citizens of this planet, want a future that isn’t limited by the inaction we are seeing on climate change now.

The People’s Climate March in New York and the other marches taking place in London, Paris, Berlin, Melbourne and Bogotá can serve as a launching point for real policies to be implemented to limit carbon emissions, encourage large scale renewable energy projects and fund ways to fight off the consequences of climate change. Photo credit: Joshua Cruse / NYC Light Brigade

Climate change is something we can all individually chose to ignore, but if we do so the consequences will be unavoidable no matter where you live. Our home state of California is already seeing the consequences of climate change firsthand. The record drought that continues to ravage California doesn’t care if you are rich and poor or what your religion or race is. The drought is touching us all. It requires us all to limit our water use, pay higher food prices and rethink the places we have decided to call home.

The impacts of climate change aren’t just here in California, no part of the world is immune from the inaction we are now seeing on climate change. The DARA report on Climate Impacts projects huge consequences for the world as it continues to warm, especially Africa and Asia. These consequences come in the form of rising seas, increasing extreme weather events, crop destruction, shocks to food supplies and yes, drought. Climate change is real, it is serious, we are causing it, but we can also slow it down.

So let’s collectively start to take some action that goes beyond everyday actions. Of course, buying local, using renewable energy, recycling and riding your bike to work are all great ways to individually make a difference, but the truth is much more is needed to stop the worst consequences of climate change. We need action from policymakers and world leaders to complete the puzzle and that’s where "We" come in. People need to get visual and vocal to show our leaders here in the U.S. and around the world that we want action on climate change.

The People’s Climate March is a perfect opportunity to do that. It comes just days before more than 100 presidents, prime ministers and other heads of state meet in New York to begin discussing solutions to the climate challenge. The People’s Climate March in New York and the other marches taking place in London, Paris, Berlin, Melbourne and Bogotá can serve as a launching point for real policies to be implemented to limit carbon emissions, encourage large scale renewable energy projects and fund ways to fight off the consequences of climate change. If we collectively support these efforts, through marches and other actions in the coming years, we will reap the benefits of a world that isn’t raved by the worst climate change could bring. So let’s collectively all get active!

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

‘This Changes Everything’ Including the Anti-Fracking Movement

McKibben to Obama: Fracking May Be Worse Than Burning Coal

People’s Climate March = Tipping Point in Fight to Halt Climate Crisis

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Microsoft's main campus in Redmond, Washington on May 12, 2017. GLENN CHAPMAN / AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft announced ambitious new plans to become carbon negative by 2030 and then go one step further and remove by 2050 all the carbon it has emitted since the company was founded in 1975, according to a company press release.

Read More
Nestlé is accelerating its efforts to bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and to address the global challenge of plastic packaging waste. Nestlé / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nestlé, the world's largest food company, said it will invest up to $2 billion to address the plastic waste crisis that it is largely responsible for.

Read More
Sponsored
Yellow soft shell D-vitamin capsule held to the sun. Helin Loik-Tomson / iStock / Getty Images

By Margherita T. Cantorna

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D, which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes, is essential for good health. Humans need vitamin D to keep healthy and to fight infections. The irony is that in winter, when people need vitamin D the most, most of us are not getting enough. So how much should we take? Should we take supplements? How do we get more? And, who needs it most?

Read More
The common murre population in Alaska has been decimated by an ocean heatwave. Linda Burek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

An expanse of uncommonly warm seawater in the Pacific Ocean created by a marine heatwave led to a mass die-off of one million seabirds, scientists have found.

Read More
Climate activists hold a banner after climbing atop the roof of the entrance of the building as they protest outside offices of Youtube during the tenth day of demonstrations by the climate change action group Extinction Rebellion, in London, on Oct. 16, 2019. PAUL ELLIS / AFP / Getty Images

By Dana Drugmand

You don't have to look far to find misinformation about climate science continuing to spread online through prominent social media channels like YouTube. That's despite the overwhelming scientific consensus that humans are driving the climate crisis.

Read More