Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The People’s Climate March: A Time Where 'We' Can Make a Difference

Climate
The People’s Climate March: A Time Where 'We' Can Make a Difference

Protecting the planet from the worst consequences of climate change is not an “I” issue, it’s a “We” issue, and notice we are using a capital “W.”  That’s why it’s important for as many people as possible to take part in the People’s Climate March in New York, the various other marches around the world, and the social media actions associated with them over the next week. The People’s Climate March on the 21st in New York is a chance for hundreds of thousands of people of all walks of life—from the business community to hundreds of youth groups, and everyone in between—to show that “We,” as citizens of this planet, want a future that isn’t limited by the inaction we are seeing on climate change now.

The People’s Climate March in New York and the other marches taking place in London, Paris, Berlin, Melbourne and Bogotá can serve as a launching point for real policies to be implemented to limit carbon emissions, encourage large scale renewable energy projects and fund ways to fight off the consequences of climate change. Photo credit: Joshua Cruse / NYC Light Brigade

Climate change is something we can all individually chose to ignore, but if we do so the consequences will be unavoidable no matter where you live. Our home state of California is already seeing the consequences of climate change firsthand. The record drought that continues to ravage California doesn’t care if you are rich and poor or what your religion or race is. The drought is touching us all. It requires us all to limit our water use, pay higher food prices and rethink the places we have decided to call home.

The impacts of climate change aren’t just here in California, no part of the world is immune from the inaction we are now seeing on climate change. The DARA report on Climate Impacts projects huge consequences for the world as it continues to warm, especially Africa and Asia. These consequences come in the form of rising seas, increasing extreme weather events, crop destruction, shocks to food supplies and yes, drought. Climate change is real, it is serious, we are causing it, but we can also slow it down.

So let’s collectively start to take some action that goes beyond everyday actions. Of course, buying local, using renewable energy, recycling and riding your bike to work are all great ways to individually make a difference, but the truth is much more is needed to stop the worst consequences of climate change. We need action from policymakers and world leaders to complete the puzzle and that’s where "We" come in. People need to get visual and vocal to show our leaders here in the U.S. and around the world that we want action on climate change.

The People’s Climate March is a perfect opportunity to do that. It comes just days before more than 100 presidents, prime ministers and other heads of state meet in New York to begin discussing solutions to the climate challenge. The People’s Climate March in New York and the other marches taking place in London, Paris, Berlin, Melbourne and Bogotá can serve as a launching point for real policies to be implemented to limit carbon emissions, encourage large scale renewable energy projects and fund ways to fight off the consequences of climate change. If we collectively support these efforts, through marches and other actions in the coming years, we will reap the benefits of a world that isn’t raved by the worst climate change could bring. So let’s collectively all get active!

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

‘This Changes Everything’ Including the Anti-Fracking Movement

McKibben to Obama: Fracking May Be Worse Than Burning Coal

People’s Climate March = Tipping Point in Fight to Halt Climate Crisis

A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

President of the European Investment Bank Werner Hoyer holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium on Jan. 30, 2020. Dursun Aydemir / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Noted author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben was among the first to celebrate word that the president of the European Investment Bank on Wednesday openly declared, "To put it mildly, gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts and economists have been saying for years if not decades.

Read More Show Less

A dwarf giraffe is seen in Uganda, Africa. Dr. Michael Brown, GCF

Nine feet tall is gigantic by human standards, but when researcher and conservationist Michael Brown spotted a giraffe in Uganda's Murchison Falls National Park that measured nine feet, four inches, he was shocked.

Read More Show Less
Kelsey Mueller, 16, pets Ruby while waiting with her family to be escorted from the evacuation zone at the Shaver Lake Marina parking lot off of CA-168 during the Creek Fire on Sept. 7, 2020 in Shaver Lake, California. Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Daisy Simmons

In a wildfire, hurricane, or other disaster, people with pets should heed the Humane Society's advice: If it isn't safe for you, it isn't safe for your animals either.

Read More Show Less