Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The Low-Down on How Sequestration Would Impact Environmental Health

The Low-Down on How Sequestration Would Impact Environmental Health

National Wildlife Federation

By Adeline Rolnick

If sequestration, the series of automatic budget cuts mandated by the Budget Control Act of 2011, goes into effect as scheduled on March 1, it will have a disastrous impact on our wildlife and ecosystems. Crucial funding for conservation—including programs that protect and restore wildlife habitat, ensure access to public lands, safeguard clean air and clean water, and invest in clean energy—is on the chopping block. And sequestration is a particularly devastating way of cutting spending: federal agencies can’t pick and choose which programs to cut, but have to cut every single program by 5.2 percent.

According to a poll released by the Pew Research Center, 77 percent of Americans think spending on the environment should either increase or stay the same.

In 2011, there were 435 million visits to lands managed by the Department of Interior—visits that supported 403,000 jobs and contributed $48.7 billion to local economies. Clean air and water, access to public lands, and protected wildlife habitats are critical to the 37 million hunters and anglers who spent $90 billion in 2011, and to the $646 billion outdoor recreation industry, which employs 6.1 million Americans. The National Park Service has already said that sequestration will force them to reduce visitor services and hours of operation, delay seasonal hiring indefinitely and possibly close some or all of certain parks.

Check out this infographic that provides the low down on how the impending budget cuts will affect environmental spending in your region:

 

Visit EcoWatch’s AIR, WATER and BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

For April's bookshelf we take a cue from Earth Day and step back to look at the bigger picture. It wasn't climate change that motivated people to attend the teach-ins and protests that marked that first observance in 1970; it was pollution, the destruction of wild lands and habitats, and the consequent deaths of species.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An Amazon.com Inc. worker walks past a row of vans outside a distribution facility on Feb. 2, 2021 in Hawthorne, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

Over the past year, Amazon has significantly expanded its warehouses in Southern California, employing residents in communities that have suffered from high unemployment rates, The Guardian reports. But a new report shows the negative environmental impacts of the boom, highlighting its impact on low-income communities of color across Southern California.

Read More Show Less
Xiulin Ruan, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering, holds up his lab's sample of the whitest paint on record. Purdue University / Jared Pike

Scientists at the University of Purdue have developed the whitest and coolest paint on record.

Read More Show Less

Less than three years after California governor Jerry Brown said the state would launch "our own damn satellite" to track pollution in the face of the Trump administration's climate denial, California, NASA, and a constellation of private companies, nonprofits, and foundations are teaming up to do just that.

Read More Show Less