Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The Little Town That Took on Fracking and Big Oil

Energy
The Little Town That Took on Fracking and Big Oil

EcoWatch

By Laura Beans

In a continuation of MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry's Aug. 17 show, which highlighted the process of hydraulic fracturing, a panel of experts gathered to discuss the specific case of rural Dryden, NY, which banned fracking within city limits in August 2011.

That same year, the ban prompted an oil corporation—which had spent millions buying up leases, from private home and farm owners in the town—to sue the town. The energy company wanted the court to force Dryden to accept industrial gas drilling, including fracking, within their city limits.

With the assistance of Earthjustice, Dryden successfully argued that their right to make local land use decisions, enshrined in the home rule provision of the New York State Constitution, applies to oil and gas development. In February 2012, a state trial court judge agreed

But the battle is not over. In May, Norse Energy Corp. USA, a subsidiary of a foreign-owned oil and gas company, filed to have the decision reversed. Filmmaker Josh Fox joins the panel to examine the contamination caused by fracking, from the poisoning of groundwater to the political corruption that surrounds the controversial fossil fuel extraction method. 

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sunrise over planet Earth. Elements of this image furnished by NASA. Elen11 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On Thursday, April 22, the world will celebrate Earth Day, the largest non-religious holiday on the globe.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
NASA has teamed up with non-profit Carbon Mapper to help pinpoint greenhouse gas sources. aapsky / Getty Images

NASA is teaming up with an innovative non-profit to hunt for greenhouse gas super-emitters responsible for the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
schnuddel / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Jenna McGuire

Commonly used herbicides across the U.S. contain highly toxic undisclosed "inert" ingredients that are lethal to bumblebees, according to a new study published Friday in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Read More Show Less
A warming climate can lead to lake stratification, including toxic algal blooms. UpdogDesigns / Getty Images

By Ayesha Tandon

New research shows that lake "stratification periods" – a seasonal separation of water into layers – will last longer in a warmer climate.

Read More Show Less
A view of Lake Powell from Romana Mesa, Utah, on Sept. 8, 2018. DEA / S. AMANTINI / Contributor / Getty Images

By Robert Glennon

Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.

Read More Show Less