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The Last Ocean: Have You Heard of Toothfish?

Cleveland International Film Festival

By Tyler Whidden

[Editor's note: Once again, EcoWatch is thrilled to be a media sponsor of the world-renowned Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF). As always, we are promoting the films in CIFF's It's Easy Being Green sidebar sponsored by Great Lakes Brewing Company. We will showcase all 10 eco-films this week and continue to promote them during the festival, April 3 - 14. Each film does an incredible job illustrating our most daunting environmental issues and providing solutions to ensure the well-being of future generations. I encourage you to see these films at CIFF, or at your local film festival or theatre. Documentaries are a great way to educate and motivate people to action.]

Have you ever heard of the Ross Sea? No? Well, not many people have and that's a good thing. The Ross Sea is located about 2,500 miles south of New Zealand on the shores of Antarctica and is considered to be the most pristine marine ecosystem on the planet, teeming with life and untouched by humankind. One of the coldest spots in the world, the mesmerizing Ross Sea provides a unique opportunity for marine biologists and scientists to study an intact thriving ecosystem. However, the secret is getting out and THE LAST OCEAN is a documentary chronicling a team of dedicated scientists as they fight to protect the sea from international fishing fleets searching for the elusive and tasty toothfish. The stakes are high as we're losing the toothfish rapidly, and that could have a lasting effect on not just the Ross Sea ecosystem, but also the entire planet. Educational and exquisite, THE LAST OCEAN puts the audience right next to the men and women who have dedicated their lives to fighting governments, industry, and public awareness, all to save the living laboratory that is Earth's last ocean.

This film is showing at the CIFF at Tower City Cinemas, 230 W Huron Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44113 on:

Saturday, April 6 at 8:50 p.m.
Sunday, April 7 at 1:55 p.m.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER and BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

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