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The Insurance Costs of Carbon Pollution

Climate

The Climate Reality Project

By Avery Palmer

Houses lie in ruins on the New Jersey shore in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.
Photo courtesy of Greenpeace

Insurance is there to help all of us cover the cost of the unfortunate, the unforeseen, and the inevitable: cars kissing bumpers, trees falling on roofs, superstorms laying waste to neighborhoods.

With extreme weather events from droughts to wildfires becoming an increasingly regular feature of our lives, most of us assume the insurance industry is developing long-term strategies to prepare for the impacts of climate change. After all, if the insurance we rely on isn’t there to help cover the costs, then who will?

But a groundbreaking new study by Ceres, a global advocate for sustainability in leadership whose Investor Network on Climate Risk manages $11 trillion in assets, reveals that most insurers aren’t preparing for climate change at all.

Climate Reality CEO Maggie L. Fox recently sat down with the authors of the report to discuss the costs of climate change and what it means for the insurance industry, our economy and citizens. This is a timely and important issue, and we hope you will take time to learn more.

Take a moment and watch this webinar with Fox, Ceres CEO Mindy Lubber and Senior Manager Sharlene Leurig about the insurance industry and the price of carbon.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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