Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The Good Stuff

Insights + Opinion
The Good Stuff

Annie Leonard

Ready for some inspiration?
 
Last summer, we wrote asking for story ideas for our new podcast series. True to form, this community answered the call, nominating dozens of individuals and organizations who’ve rolled up their sleeves and figured out solutions to some big environmental and social challenges.
 
Today, we’re happy to announce the launch of The Good Stuff, our monthly podcast series featuring these change makers.

The first in the series, Take THAT, Plastic Bags, looks at efforts to beat back the plastic bag attack and features interviews with ChicoBag founder Andy Keller, and Brownsville, TX community organizer Rose Timmer, who led the effort in her city to ban the bag.
 
Click here to listen or download the first podcast.

Every month, we’ll be releasing a new podcast, complete with inspiring stories, commentary from our own Annie Leonard, and ways for you to get involved in your own community.
 
Why a podcast focused on solutions?
 
It’s a rare day in our office that we don’t hear someone say, “I want make change but I don’t know what to do,” or “I’d like to help, but I’m only one person.”
 
We’re making The Good Stuff as an antidote to that kind of thinking.
 
The stories we’ll feature prove that the best place to start is with your passion and that by joining together we magnify our power to accomplish remarkable things.
 
We hope you enjoy the podcasts, embed them on your site or blog, share them with friends and, most importantly, let us know what you think by leaving a comment on the podcast page.
 
We’ll be releasing one podcast a month, so check back often for the latest inspiration download!
 
In the meantime, enjoy, and thanks a ton for everything you do to inspire us.

Reindeers at their winter location in northern Sweden on Feb. 4, 2020, near Ornskoldsvik. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP via Getty Images

Sweden's reindeer have a problem. In winter, they feed on lichens buried beneath the snow. But the climate crisis is making this difficult. Warmer temperatures mean moisture sometimes falls as rain instead of snow. When the air refreezes, a layer of ice forms between the reindeer and their meal, forcing them to wander further in search of ideal conditions. And sometimes, this means crossing busy roads.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Great Lakes, including Lake Michigan, experienced some of their warmest temperatures on record in the summer of 2020. Ken Ilio / Moment / Getty Images

Heatwaves are not just distinct to the land. A recent study found lakes are susceptible to temperature rise too, causing "lake heatwaves," The Independent reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Starfish might appear simple creatures, but the way these animals' distinctive biology evolved was, until recently, unknown. FangXiaNuo / Getty Images

By Aaron W Hunter

A chance discovery of a beautifully preserved fossil in the desert landscape of Morocco has solved one of the great mysteries of biology and paleontology: how starfish evolved their arms.

Read More Show Less
U.S. President Joe Biden sits in the Oval Office as he signs a series of orders at the White House in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2021. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

President Joe Biden officially took office Wednesday, and immediately set to work reversing some of former President Donald Trump's environmental policies.

Read More Show Less
Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

In many schools, the study of climate change is limited to the science. But at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, students in one class also learn how to take climate action.

Read More Show Less