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The Good Stuff

Insights + Opinion

Annie Leonard

Ready for some inspiration?
 
Last summer, we wrote asking for story ideas for our new podcast series. True to form, this community answered the call, nominating dozens of individuals and organizations who’ve rolled up their sleeves and figured out solutions to some big environmental and social challenges.
 
Today, we’re happy to announce the launch of The Good Stuff, our monthly podcast series featuring these change makers.

The first in the series, Take THAT, Plastic Bags, looks at efforts to beat back the plastic bag attack and features interviews with ChicoBag founder Andy Keller, and Brownsville, TX community organizer Rose Timmer, who led the effort in her city to ban the bag.
 
Click here to listen or download the first podcast.

Every month, we’ll be releasing a new podcast, complete with inspiring stories, commentary from our own Annie Leonard, and ways for you to get involved in your own community.
 
Why a podcast focused on solutions?
 
It’s a rare day in our office that we don’t hear someone say, “I want make change but I don’t know what to do,” or “I’d like to help, but I’m only one person.”
 
We’re making The Good Stuff as an antidote to that kind of thinking.
 
The stories we’ll feature prove that the best place to start is with your passion and that by joining together we magnify our power to accomplish remarkable things.
 
We hope you enjoy the podcasts, embed them on your site or blog, share them with friends and, most importantly, let us know what you think by leaving a comment on the podcast page.
 
We’ll be releasing one podcast a month, so check back often for the latest inspiration download!
 
In the meantime, enjoy, and thanks a ton for everything you do to inspire us.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

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Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

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ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

By Dave Cooke

So, they finally went and did it — the Trump administration just finalized a rule to undo requirements on manufacturers to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new passenger cars and trucks. Even with the economy at the brink of a recession, they went forward with a policy they know is bad for consumers — their own analysis shows that American drivers are going to spend hundreds of dollars more in fuel as a result of this stupid policy — but they went ahead and did it anyway.

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By Richard Connor

A blood test that screens for more than 50 types of cancer could help doctors treat patients at an earlier stage than previously possible, a new study shows. The method was used to screen for more than 50 types of cancer — including particularly deadly variants such as pancreatic, ovarian, bowel and brain.

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Ian Sane / Flickr

Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control showed a larger number of young people coming down with COVID-19 than first expected, with patients under the age of 45 comprising more than a third of all cases, and one in five of those patients requiring hospitalization. That also tends to be the group most likely to use e-cigarettes.

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