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The Eco Way to 'Shop' on Black Friday

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Patagonia, the California-based company that makes heavy-duty clothing for rugged sports like surfing, mountain climbing and snowboarding, is offering an environmentally friendly way to "shop" on Black Friday. They've dubbed it "investing in the things we already own."

You don't wear it anymore, but it's too good to throw away. Come swap it for something else on Black Friday. Photo credit: Patagonia

The company says that by keeping garments in circulation an additional nine months, it could decrease our carbon, waste and water footprints by 20-30 percent each because we’re making and throwing away less. And this, they say, would have a greater impact on stemming climate change than fiber choices, production practices, laundering or recycling.

"Patagonia builds clothing that is made to last—sometimes longer than a person has a use for it," says the company. "Recycling is great, but the most responsible option is to get those items that are no longer being used into the hands of someone who will put them back into action."

That's what they're aiming to do with the Worn Wear Swaps they're hosting in eight major U.S. cities, working with Yerdle, a company that offers credits to help people get their unused items back in circulation and help other people avoid buying new items. Customers are invited to drop by one of these all-day events and bring their used Patagonia clothing to swap for something off the rack. If they don't find anything they like, they will get Yerdle credits to use for items Yerdle offers online. The events will also feature food, refreshments and music. If you're not in one of the cities listed below, you can swap using the Yerdle app where they'll be hosting the digital Patagonia #WornWear collection of passed-along items "ready for their next adventure."

Here's where the events are taking place today:

  • Boston (346 Newbury Street)
  • Cardiff (2185 San Elijo Avenue)
  • Chicago (1800 N. Clybourn Avenue)
  • Denver (1431 15th Street)
  • New York City (313 Bowery)
  • Portland (907 NW Irving Street)
  • San Francisco (770 North Point)
  • Santa Monica (1344 4th Street)

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