Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Vandals Destroy Beloved Oregon Rock Formation

Popular
Vandals Destroy Beloved Oregon Rock Formation

Oregon's Cape Kiwanda sandstone pedestal, affectionately known as "the duckbill," appears to have been intentionally destroyed by a group of vandals.

Tourists have destroyed a beloved sandstone rock formation at Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area in Oregon.Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

Visitor David Kalas of Hillsboro captured footage of a group of strangers pushing down the iconic formation onto the ground and shattering.

The incident occurred around 5 p.m. on Aug. 29, according to KATU News.

"I kind of laughed to myself cause I thought there was no way that they could knock it down but then I noticed that it started wobbling and then I started to record it as two of the guys managed to knock it down," Kalas told the local television station.

"I asked them, you know, why they knocked the rock down, and the reply I got was: their buddy broke their leg earlier because of that rock," Kalas added. "They basically told me themselves that it was a safety hazard, and that they did the world or Oregon a favor."

Kalas described that the perpetrators—who have not yet been identified—were laughing and taking pictures of the destruction.

"They were just standing on top of the rubble of the rock, laughing, smiling, giggling," he said. "I just want them to learn a lesson you know, because if they do this here they will probably do it elsewhere."

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department first discovered the crumbled Pacific Northwest monument last week but did not initially suspect any foul play. That is, until the horrific footage surfaced.

"At the time it was discovered, there was no sign the formation had been vandalized," the department wrote on Facebook earlier today. "Since then, media in Oregon have obtained a video apparently showing a group of visitors pushing the formation to the ground."

"No one was injured, fortunately; but the rubble serves as a sobering reminder of the ever present dangers of our fragile coastal rocks and cliffs. Who knows what will collapse next?" Oregon State Parks stated in an earlier Facebook post.

The department is now working with state police to review the incident to best decide how to respond.

UPI reports that the vandals could face fines of at least $435 as well as criminal charges.

The duckbill was a popular attraction for visitors of the coastal park. Admirers liked to climb the rock and take photographs with it, from staging yoga poses to marriage proposals.

Park officials have technically fenced off the area for safety because many people had died while climbing the surrounding cliffs in recent years. According to the Statesman Journal:

"Seven people have died in the area since 2009. Six fatal falls have taken place during the past two years. Rescue efforts by the local fire district and U.S. Coast Guard cost upward of $21,000 per hour, often topping out near $106,000.

"Yet people continue to flood past the fence and signs. Adults, teenagers, grandparents, photographers and even parents with small children disregard the warnings."

However, with the recent incident, looks like the park rangers will no longer have to worry about as many unwanted visitors.

The Instagram hashtag #ripthatpnwrock has taken off since news surfaced of the toppling.

Florida Wildlife Federation / NBC2News / YouTube

In a dramatic rescue captured on camera, a Florida man ran into a pond and pried open an alligator's mouth in order to rescue his beloved puppy, all without dropping his cigar.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Imagesines / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Jean-Marc Neveu and Olivier Civil never expected to find themselves battling against disposable mask pollution.

When they founded their recycling start-up Plaxtil in 2017, it was textile waste they set their sights on. The project developed a process that turned fabrics into a new recyclable material they describe as "ecological plastic."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Fossil fuel companies received $110 billion in direct and indirect financial assistance during the coronavirus pandemic, including up to $15.2 billion in direct federal relief. Andrew Hart /

By Bret Wilkins

In a year in which the United States has already suffered 16 climate-driven extreme weather events causing more than $1 billion in economic damages, and as millions of American workers face loss of essential unemployment benefits due to congressional inaction, a report published Monday reveals the Trump administration has given fossil fuel companies as much as $15.2 billion in direct relief — and tens of billions more indirectly — through federal COVID-19 recovery programs since March.

Read More Show Less
Flint corn is an example of pre-contact food. Elenathewise / Getty Images

By Ashia Aubourg

As Thanksgiving approaches, some Indigenous organizations and activists caution against perpetuating further injustices towards Native communities. Indigenous activist Mariah Gladstone, for example, encourages eaters to celebrate the harvest time in ways that do not involve stereotypes and pilgrim stories.

Read More Show Less

By Alex Middleton

Losing weight and reducing fat is a hard battle to fight. Thankfully, there are fat burner supplements that help you gain your target body and goal. However, how would you know which supplement is right for you?

Read More Show Less