Quantcast

The Big Fix

Insights + Opinion

Stefanie Penn Spear

On April 22, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig sank into the Gulf of Mexico creating the worst oil spill in history—killing 11 men and injuring 17 others. Until the oil well was capped on Sept. 19, 2010, 205 million gallons of crude oil and more than 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersant, Corexit, spread into the sea.

Most people thought 87 days after the BP explosion that the impacts of the spill were over, but, as you learn from filmmakers Josh and Rebecca Tickell in their documentary The Big Fix, that's when the story was just beginning. Thanks to the filmmakers, producers of the award-winning Sundance documentary Fuel, people can get a true accounting of the aftermath of the BP oil spill, including the detrimental consequences that the spraying of the dispersant Corexit is having on all species living along the gulf coast.

The film exposes the corruption behind the cleanup of the spill. Interviews throughout the film reveal that behind the Internal Revenue Service the second largest generator of money for the U.S. government comes from the collection of offshore oil field revenues and royalties, BP is the single largest oil contributor to the Pentagon, and many U.S. Congress members receive the majority of their campaign dollars from the fossil fuel industry or corporations closely tied with oil. It's no wonder corruption runs rampant when dealing with this deplorable event.

I was invited to join a panel of speakers following the films premier in New York City, and I watched this remarkable film that left me speechless and wishing to never drive a gasoline powered car again. The showing of the film was part of 7 Nights of Awareness, produced by the wonderful Paul McGinniss of The New York Green Advocate, where each night featured a post-screening Q & A with the filmmakers and notable environmental advocates from New York City and around the country.

I left the theater committed to telling others about this film and working to reduce my consumption of fossil fuels. I'm working to bring this film to my home town of Cleveland and encouraging others to like the film on Facebook, follow the Twitter handle @The_Big_Fix and rank the film on The Internet Movie Database.

For more information on The Big Fix, contact Nicole Landers at nicole@greenplanet3d.com or 323-377-4356.

For more information on the work being done in the Gulf region, visit the Save Our Gulf website, an initiative of Waterkeeper Alliance to support the Gulf Waterkeepers directly impacted by the BP oil disaster.

--------

Click here to read other Editor's Daily posts.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Bumblebees flying and pollinating a creeping thyme flower. emeliemaria / iStock / Getty Images

It pays to pollinate in Minnesota.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of icebergs on Arctic Ocean in Greenland. Explora_2005 / iStock / Getty Images

The annual Arctic thaw has kicked off with record-setting ice melt and sea ice loss that is several weeks ahead of schedule, scientists said, as the New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Sled dog teams pull researchers from the Danish Meteorological Institute through meltwater on the Greenland ice sheet in early June, 2019. Danish Meteorological Institute / Steffen M. Olsen

By Jon Queally

In yet the latest shocking image depicting just how fast the world's natural systems are changing due to the global climate emergency, a photograph showing a vast expanse of melted Arctic ice in Greenland — one in which a pair of sled dog teams appear to be walking on water — has gone viral.

Read More Show Less
CAFOs often store animal waste in massive, open-air lagoons, like this one at Vanguard Farms in Chocowinity, North Carolina. Bacteria feeding on the animal waste turns the mixture a bright pink. picstever / Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0

By Tia Schwab

It has been almost a year since Hurricane Florence slammed the Carolinas, dumping a record 30 inches of rainfall in some parts of the states. At least 52 people died, and property and economic losses reached $24 billion, with nearly $17 billion in North Carolina alone. Flood waters also killed an estimated 3.5 million chickens and 5,500 hogs.

Read More Show Less
Members of the NY Renews coalition gathered before New York lawmakers reached a deal on the Climate and Communities Protection Act. NYRenews / Twitter

By Julia Conley

Grassroots climate campaigners in New York applauded on Monday after state lawmakers reached a deal on sweeping climate legislation, paving the way for the passage of what could be some of the country's most ambitious environmental reforms.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
In this picture taken on June 4, an Indian boatman walks amid boats on the dried bed of a lake at Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary, on the eve of World Environment Day. Sam Panthaky / AFP / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Nearly 50 people died on Saturday in one Indian state as record-breaking heatwaves across the country have caused an increasingly desperate situation.

Read More Show Less
A man carries a poster in New York City during the second annual nationwide March For Science on April 14, 2018. Kena Betancur / Getty Images

By Will J. Grant

In an ideal world, people would look at issues with a clear focus only on the facts. But in the real world, we know that doesn't happen often.

People often look at issues through the prism of their own particular political identity — and have probably always done so.

Read More Show Less

YinYang / E+ / Getty Images

In a blow to the Trump administration, the Supreme Court ruled Monday to uphold a Virginia ban on mining uranium, Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less