Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Texas Passes Ban on Fracking Bans (Yes, You Read that Right)

Energy
Texas Passes Ban on Fracking Bans (Yes, You Read that Right)

The Texas state legislature voted yesterday to ban fracking bans. Ever since the people of Denton, Texas voted to ban fracking last November, state lawmakers in cahoots with the oil and gas industry and the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, have attempted to strip municipalities like Denton of home rule authority to override the city’s ban.

Approved by the Texas House and Senate, the bill banning fracking bans is expected to be signed by Governor Greg Abbott.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

In response, citizens banded together to form Frack Free Denton to fight for home rule. The group has put together a powerful film, which premieres on Friday, documenting their fight to ban fracking within city limits in the heart of oil and gas country. The vote comes despite recent findings by a team of researchers from Southern Methodist University that linked the earthquakes in one area of Texas, which did not have earthquakes prior to the fracking boom..

Marketplace′s Kai Ryssdal and Scott Trang discuss Texas's ban and other states considering similar bills. "The bill would provide what's called state preemption and that is state law here would trump anything that local jurisdictions, cities and towns pass," says Trang.

A similar bill, in Oklahoma, passed one chamber. "The sponsor of that bill said he wants to 'get ahead of what we're seeing in other states,'" reports Trang. Ryssdal asks if there is a group connecting all these state lawmakers. Trang's response? You guessed it: ALEC.

Listen to the full story here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Don't Frack with Denton: A Community's Fight to Defend Home Rule

ReThink Energy: ‘We Will Ensure Florida Keeps Fracking Out of Our State’

Frack-Happy Texas Forced to Face the Reality of Fracking-Related Earthquakes

A sea turtle rescued from Israel's devastating oil spill. MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP via Getty Images

Rescue workers in Israel are using a surprising cure to save the sea turtles harmed by a devastating oil spill: mayonnaise!

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "digital twin of Earth." European Space Agency

As the weather grows more severe, and its damages more expensive and fatal, current weather predictions fall short in providing reliable information on Earth's rapidly changing systems.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice in places such as Greenland could stop a critical ocean current. Paul Souders / Getty Images

The climate crisis could push an important ocean current past a critical tipping point sooner than expected, new research suggests.

Read More Show Less
California Gov. Gavin Newsom tours the Chevron oil field west of Bakersfield, where a spill of more than 900,000 gallons flowed into a dry creek bed, on July 24, 2019. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Accusing California regulators of "reckless disregard" for public "health and safety," the environmental advocacy group Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday sued the administration of Gov. Gavin Newsom for approving thousands of oil and gas drilling and fracking projects without the required environmental review.

Read More Show Less
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Kenyan professor Wangari Maathai poses during the COP15 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark on December 15, 2009. Olivier Morin / AFP / Getty Images

By Kate Whiting

From Greta Thunberg to Sir David Attenborough, the headline-grabbing climate change activists and environmentalists of today are predominantly white. But like many areas of society, those whose voices are heard most often are not necessarily representative of the whole.

Read More Show Less