Quantcast

Texas Passes Ban on Fracking Bans (Yes, You Read that Right)

Energy

The Texas state legislature voted yesterday to ban fracking bans. Ever since the people of Denton, Texas voted to ban fracking last November, state lawmakers in cahoots with the oil and gas industry and the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, have attempted to strip municipalities like Denton of home rule authority to override the city’s ban.

Approved by the Texas House and Senate, the bill banning fracking bans is expected to be signed by Governor Greg Abbott.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

In response, citizens banded together to form Frack Free Denton to fight for home rule. The group has put together a powerful film, which premieres on Friday, documenting their fight to ban fracking within city limits in the heart of oil and gas country. The vote comes despite recent findings by a team of researchers from Southern Methodist University that linked the earthquakes in one area of Texas, which did not have earthquakes prior to the fracking boom..

Marketplace′s Kai Ryssdal and Scott Trang discuss Texas's ban and other states considering similar bills. "The bill would provide what's called state preemption and that is state law here would trump anything that local jurisdictions, cities and towns pass," says Trang.

A similar bill, in Oklahoma, passed one chamber. "The sponsor of that bill said he wants to 'get ahead of what we're seeing in other states,'" reports Trang. Ryssdal asks if there is a group connecting all these state lawmakers. Trang's response? You guessed it: ALEC.

Listen to the full story here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Don't Frack with Denton: A Community's Fight to Defend Home Rule

ReThink Energy: ‘We Will Ensure Florida Keeps Fracking Out of Our State’

Frack-Happy Texas Forced to Face the Reality of Fracking-Related Earthquakes

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Farm waste being prepared for composting. USDA / Lance Cheung

By Tim Lydon

Can the United States make progress on its food-waste problems? Cities like San Francisco — and a growing list of actions by the federal government — show that it's possible.

Read More
Pexels

By C. Michael White

More than two-thirds of Americans take dietary supplements. The vast majority of consumers — 84 percent — are confident the products are safe and effective.

Read More
Sponsored
Pexels

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Coconut oil has become quite trendy in recent years.

Read More
The common giant tree frog from Madagascar is one of many species impacted by recent climate change. John J. Wiens / EurekAlert!

By Jessica Corbett

The human-caused climate crisis could cause the extinction of 30 percent of the world's plant and animal species by 2070, even accounting for species' abilities to disperse and shift their niches to tolerate hotter temperatures, according to a study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More
SolStock / Moment / Getty Images

By Tyler Wells Lynch

For years, Toni Genberg assumed a healthy garden was a healthy habitat. That's how she approached the landscaping around her home in northern Virginia. On trips to the local gardening center, she would privilege aesthetics, buying whatever looked pretty, "which was typically ornamental or invasive plants," she said. Then, in 2014, Genberg attended a talk by Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware. "I learned I was actually starving our wildlife," she said.

Read More