Quantcast

'History in the Making': Tesla Switches on World's Largest Battery

South Australia officially activated the world's biggest battery on Friday. The feat was achieved much to the credit of Elon Musk, who made a daring bet to “get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free."

Musk was responding to a challenge from Australian billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes to help fix the Australian state's electricity woes. Losing the bet would have cost the Tesla CEO "probably $50 million or more."


Not only did the Musk win the bet, his company built the football field-sized facility in Jamestown (about 125 miles north of Adelaide) about a month and a half ahead of schedule.

"The completion of the world's largest lithium-ion battery in record time shows that a sustainable, effective energy solution is possible," Tesla said in a statement Friday at the battery's launch.

The 100-megawatt Powerpack system is designed to power 30,000 houses for an hour during a blackout. The Australian state was hit by a string of power outages last year.

"South Australia is now leading the world in dispatchable renewable energy. This is history in the making," South Australia Premier Jay Weatherill said Friday of the Tesla battery.

Australia is one of the world's biggest producers of coal. The polluting fossil fuel and is the country's primary source for generating electricity. But the South Australian state government has gone in the other direction and has invested heavily in renewable energy ever since Weatherill took office in 2011.

Critics including Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull have blamed the 2016 blackouts on the state's electricity grid, which relies on 40 percent renewables, but Weatherill says the power outages were caused by severe weather.

Tesla's battery will charge from Neoen's Hornsdale wind farm near Jamestown, South Australia and deliver electricity during peak hours.

"The battery will bring essential grid stability by providing a fast injection of power. But it will not solve the problem of blackouts on its own," Franck Woitiez, managing director of Neoen Australia, told the Financial Times.

Still, Woitiez rejected the federal government's notion that coal should remain in Australia's energy future.

"Coal is a thing of the past. In 2017 we are showing that the energy transition is happening. Battery costs are falling and it is now cheaper to build renewables than new coal plants."

Sponsored
zeljkosantrac / E+ / Getty Images

Medically reviewed by Hrefna Palsdottir, MS

Oats are considered to be one of the healthiest grains on earth. Find out why and how to incorporate this breakfast staple into your morning routine.

Read More Show Less
Youth activists ages 11-18 learn to fight plastic pollution at the inaugural Ocean Heroes Bootcamp. Ocean Heroes Bootcamp

By 2018 Ocean Heroes: Claire MacQueen (13 years old), Sabine Thomas (13) and Ava Inskeep (14)

We despise single-use plastics. We want to keep our oceans and our beaches clean. Early last year I (Claire) lived in India for several months and became curious about plastic waste, as it was much more visible in India than back home in the U.S. Seeing all the plastic waste while I was visiting helped me to understand that much of the trash produced by the U.S. actually ends up in developing countries, like India, which does not have a proper waste management system like we do at home, which causes a ton of trash to end up in waterways and the ocean.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day event in South Carolina on Jan. 21. Sean Rayford / Getty Images

Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders announced Tuesday that he will run for president in 2020, becoming the latest candidate in a crowded Democratic primary field to promise a Green New Deal if elected, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
Degraded coral reefs at Kahekili Beach Park in west Maui, Hawaii. Peter Swarzenski / Usgs

In a case watched closely both by polluting industries and clean water advocates across the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to take up an appeal of a Clean Water Act case out of Hawaii concerning treated sewage flowing into the Pacific Ocean from injection wells.

Read More Show Less
A woman works at a distrubiton station at the 855,000-square-foot Amazon fulfillment center in Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, on Feb. 5. JOHANNES EISELE / AFP / Getty Images

Amazon will strive to cut carbon emissions from its shipments in half by 2030, the e-commerce giant said Monday. The retailer's plan calls for an increase in the use of electric delivery vehicles and renewable energy as well as pressuring suppliers to use less packaging.

Read More Show Less