Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Ten Ways Monsanto and Big Ag Are Trying to Kill You—And the Planet

GMO

Organic Consumers Association

Energy-intensive industrial farming practices that rely on toxic chemicals and genetically engineered crops are not just undermining public health, they're destroying the planet.

Here's how:

  1. Generating massive greenhouse gas pollution (CO2, methane, nitrous oxide) and global warming, while promoting false solutions such as industrial biofuels, so-called drought-resistant crops, and genetically engineered trees
  2. Polluting the environment and the soil-food web with pesticides, chemical fertilizers, and persistent toxins, including dioxin
  3. Draining and polluting wetlands and aquifers, turning farmland into desert
  4. Poisoning wells and municipal drinking water, lakes, and rivers
  5. Chopping down the rainforests for monoculture GMO crops, biofuels and cattle grazing
  6. Increasing the cost of food, while reducing nutrition and biodiversity
  7. Spawning pesticide-resistant superbugs and weeds, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria
  8. Generating new and more virulent plant, animal and human diseases
  9. Utilizing wasteful fossil fuel-intensive practices and encouraging the expansion of natural gas fracking and tar sands extraction (which destroy forests, aquifers, and farmland)
  10. Stealing money from the 99 percent to give huge subsidies to the 1 percent wealthiest, most chemical and energy-intensive farms and food producers

It's not enough to stop eating genetically engineered food. If we want a liveable planet we've got to boycott all factory farmed food and make the great transition from energy and chemical-intensive agriculture to a relocalized and organic system of food and farming. The world according to monsanto is a recipe for disaster. Monsanto and Big Ag contaminate every link in the food chain, threatening the very foundation of life—living nutrient-rich soil, clean water, resilient crops, healthy animals, stable climates, and diverse food sources. The good news is that agro-ecological and organic methods can reverse this threat and sustain food production for future generations, but we don't have much time to turn things around.

Take action by clicking here.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

By Dave Cooke

So, they finally went and did it — the Trump administration just finalized a rule to undo requirements on manufacturers to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new passenger cars and trucks. Even with the economy at the brink of a recession, they went forward with a policy they know is bad for consumers — their own analysis shows that American drivers are going to spend hundreds of dollars more in fuel as a result of this stupid policy — but they went ahead and did it anyway.

Read More Show Less

By Richard Connor

A blood test that screens for more than 50 types of cancer could help doctors treat patients at an earlier stage than previously possible, a new study shows. The method was used to screen for more than 50 types of cancer — including particularly deadly variants such as pancreatic, ovarian, bowel and brain.

Read More Show Less
Ian Sane / Flickr

Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control showed a larger number of young people coming down with COVID-19 than first expected, with patients under the age of 45 comprising more than a third of all cases, and one in five of those patients requiring hospitalization. That also tends to be the group most likely to use e-cigarettes.

Read More Show Less