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Ten Ways Monsanto and Big Ag Are Trying to Kill You—And the Planet

GMO

Organic Consumers Association

Energy-intensive industrial farming practices that rely on toxic chemicals and genetically engineered crops are not just undermining public health, they're destroying the planet.

Here's how:

  1. Generating massive greenhouse gas pollution (CO2, methane, nitrous oxide) and global warming, while promoting false solutions such as industrial biofuels, so-called drought-resistant crops, and genetically engineered trees
  2. Polluting the environment and the soil-food web with pesticides, chemical fertilizers, and persistent toxins, including dioxin
  3. Draining and polluting wetlands and aquifers, turning farmland into desert
  4. Poisoning wells and municipal drinking water, lakes, and rivers
  5. Chopping down the rainforests for monoculture GMO crops, biofuels and cattle grazing
  6. Increasing the cost of food, while reducing nutrition and biodiversity
  7. Spawning pesticide-resistant superbugs and weeds, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria
  8. Generating new and more virulent plant, animal and human diseases
  9. Utilizing wasteful fossil fuel-intensive practices and encouraging the expansion of natural gas fracking and tar sands extraction (which destroy forests, aquifers, and farmland)
  10. Stealing money from the 99 percent to give huge subsidies to the 1 percent wealthiest, most chemical and energy-intensive farms and food producers

It's not enough to stop eating genetically engineered food. If we want a liveable planet we've got to boycott all factory farmed food and make the great transition from energy and chemical-intensive agriculture to a relocalized and organic system of food and farming. The world according to monsanto is a recipe for disaster. Monsanto and Big Ag contaminate every link in the food chain, threatening the very foundation of life—living nutrient-rich soil, clean water, resilient crops, healthy animals, stable climates, and diverse food sources. The good news is that agro-ecological and organic methods can reverse this threat and sustain food production for future generations, but we don't have much time to turn things around.

Take action by clicking here.

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